Efficacy of Lactobacillus GG in aboriginal children with acute diarrhoeal disease

A randomised clinical trial

Brett Ritchie, David Brewster, Cuong Tran, Geoffrey Davidson, Yvette McNeil, Ross Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of probiotic therapy for acute rotavirus infectious diarrhoea in an indigenous setting with bacterial/parasitic diarrhoea is unclear. In the present study, we assessed the efficacy of probiotics in Australian Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory admitted to hospital with diarrhoeal disease.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in Aboriginal children (ages 4 months–2 years), admitted to hospital with acute diarrhoeal disease (>3 loose stools per day). Children received either oral Lactobacillus GG (5 × 109 colony-forming units 3 times per day for 3 days; n = 33) or placebo (n = 31). Small intestinal functional capacity was assessed by the noninvasive 13C-sucrose breath test on days 1 and 4.

RESULTS: Both groups showed mean improvement in the sucrose breath test after 4 days; however, there was no difference (mean, 95% confidence interval) between probiotic (2.9 [cumulative percentage of dose recovered at 90 minutes]; 1.7-4.2) and placebo (3.7; 2.3-5.2) groups. Probiotics did not change the duration of diarrhoea, total diarrhoea stools, or diarrhoea score compared with placebo. There was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in diarrhoea frequency on day 2 between probiotics (3.3 [loose stools]; 2.5-4.3) and placebo (4.7; 3.8-5.7) groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus GG did not appear to enhance short-term recovery following acute diarrhoeal illness in this setting.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-624
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Lactobacillus rhamnosus
Acute Disease
Probiotics
Diarrhea
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Breath Tests
Sucrose
Northern Territory
Rotavirus
Stem Cells
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

Ritchie, Brett ; Brewster, David ; Tran, Cuong ; Davidson, Geoffrey ; McNeil, Yvette ; Butler, Ross. / Efficacy of Lactobacillus GG in aboriginal children with acute diarrhoeal disease : A randomised clinical trial. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 50, No. 6. pp. 619-624.
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Efficacy of Lactobacillus GG in aboriginal children with acute diarrhoeal disease : A randomised clinical trial. / Ritchie, Brett; Brewster, David; Tran, Cuong; Davidson, Geoffrey; McNeil, Yvette; Butler, Ross.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Vol. 50, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 619-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Efficacy of Lactobacillus GG in aboriginal children with acute diarrhoeal disease

T2 - A randomised clinical trial

AU - Ritchie, Brett

AU - Brewster, David

AU - Tran, Cuong

AU - Davidson, Geoffrey

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AU - Butler, Ross

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of probiotic therapy for acute rotavirus infectious diarrhoea in an indigenous setting with bacterial/parasitic diarrhoea is unclear. In the present study, we assessed the efficacy of probiotics in Australian Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory admitted to hospital with diarrhoeal disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in Aboriginal children (ages 4 months–2 years), admitted to hospital with acute diarrhoeal disease (>3 loose stools per day). Children received either oral Lactobacillus GG (5 × 109 colony-forming units 3 times per day for 3 days; n = 33) or placebo (n = 31). Small intestinal functional capacity was assessed by the noninvasive 13C-sucrose breath test on days 1 and 4.RESULTS: Both groups showed mean improvement in the sucrose breath test after 4 days; however, there was no difference (mean, 95% confidence interval) between probiotic (2.9 [cumulative percentage of dose recovered at 90 minutes]; 1.7-4.2) and placebo (3.7; 2.3-5.2) groups. Probiotics did not change the duration of diarrhoea, total diarrhoea stools, or diarrhoea score compared with placebo. There was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in diarrhoea frequency on day 2 between probiotics (3.3 [loose stools]; 2.5-4.3) and placebo (4.7; 3.8-5.7) groups. CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus GG did not appear to enhance short-term recovery following acute diarrhoeal illness in this setting.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The effectiveness of probiotic therapy for acute rotavirus infectious diarrhoea in an indigenous setting with bacterial/parasitic diarrhoea is unclear. In the present study, we assessed the efficacy of probiotics in Australian Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory admitted to hospital with diarrhoeal disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted in Aboriginal children (ages 4 months–2 years), admitted to hospital with acute diarrhoeal disease (>3 loose stools per day). Children received either oral Lactobacillus GG (5 × 109 colony-forming units 3 times per day for 3 days; n = 33) or placebo (n = 31). Small intestinal functional capacity was assessed by the noninvasive 13C-sucrose breath test on days 1 and 4.RESULTS: Both groups showed mean improvement in the sucrose breath test after 4 days; however, there was no difference (mean, 95% confidence interval) between probiotic (2.9 [cumulative percentage of dose recovered at 90 minutes]; 1.7-4.2) and placebo (3.7; 2.3-5.2) groups. Probiotics did not change the duration of diarrhoea, total diarrhoea stools, or diarrhoea score compared with placebo. There was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in diarrhoea frequency on day 2 between probiotics (3.3 [loose stools]; 2.5-4.3) and placebo (4.7; 3.8-5.7) groups. CONCLUSIONS: Lactobacillus GG did not appear to enhance short-term recovery following acute diarrhoeal illness in this setting.

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