Empowering Patient Minority Populations: Self medication management program for adult patients in custody

Hanan Abdalla, Patrick Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In custodial environments, once the offenders have been located to a correctional facility they lose most of their privileges, including control over their own activities of daily living (James & Glade, 2002). In the community, someone with a chronic disease may manage their medications, monitor their own progress and report side effects and persistent symptoms. In custody, traditionally prisoners must hand over their medications and then present at set times for ‘pill parades’, (NSW Health PD2005_527, 2005). This is disempowering to the patients, inflexible in terms of timing (often leading to meaning sub-optimal therapy and prevents them from actively managing their own health. This results in non-adherence both in custody and frequently, following release. As some patientsreceive at least one medication to treat a mental illness during their time in custody this non-adherence after release may result in re-offending and further detention (Heilburn, A. 1979).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-11
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Pharmacy Journal
Volume26
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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