Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians

Najith Amarasena, Kostas Kapellas, Michael Skilton, Louise Maple-Brown, Alex Brown, P. Mark Bartold, Kerin O'Dea, D Celermajer, Lisa Jamieson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objectives: To determine factors associated with routine dental attendance in Aboriginal Australians.

    Methods: Data of 271 Aboriginal adults residing in Australia’s Northern Territory were used. Routine dental attendance was defined as last visiting a dentist less than one year ago or visiting a dentist for a check-up. Both bivariate and multivariable analytical techniques were used.

    Results: While 27% visited a dentist in the past year, 29% of these visited for a check-up. In bivariate analysis, being female, low psychological distress, and low clinical attachment loss (CAL) were associated with visiting a dentist within last year. Being aged younger than 39 years, male, no oral health impairment, being caries-free, low CAL, and low apolipoprotein B were associated with visiting for a check-up. Clinical attachment loss remained associated with visiting a dentist less than one year ago while being younger than 39 years and having no oral health impairment remained associated with usually visiting for a check-up in multivariable analysis.

    Conclusions: Younger age, no oral health impairment, and low CAL were associated with routine dental attendance among Indigenous Australians.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)67-80
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
    Volume27
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Dentists
    Tooth
    Oral Health
    Northern Territory
    Apolipoproteins B
    Psychology
    Health

    Cite this

    Amarasena, Najith ; Kapellas, Kostas ; Skilton, Michael ; Maple-Brown, Louise ; Brown, Alex ; Bartold, P. Mark ; O'Dea, Kerin ; Celermajer, D ; Jamieson, Lisa. / Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians. In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2016 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 67-80.
    @article{c4c78e23b78b47fe8d104d9deab1300d,
    title = "Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians",
    abstract = "Objectives: To determine factors associated with routine dental attendance in Aboriginal Australians. Methods: Data of 271 Aboriginal adults residing in Australia’s Northern Territory were used. Routine dental attendance was defined as last visiting a dentist less than one year ago or visiting a dentist for a check-up. Both bivariate and multivariable analytical techniques were used. Results: While 27{\%} visited a dentist in the past year, 29{\%} of these visited for a check-up. In bivariate analysis, being female, low psychological distress, and low clinical attachment loss (CAL) were associated with visiting a dentist within last year. Being aged younger than 39 years, male, no oral health impairment, being caries-free, low CAL, and low apolipoprotein B were associated with visiting for a check-up. Clinical attachment loss remained associated with visiting a dentist less than one year ago while being younger than 39 years and having no oral health impairment remained associated with usually visiting for a check-up in multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Younger age, no oral health impairment, and low CAL were associated with routine dental attendance among Indigenous Australians.",
    author = "Najith Amarasena and Kostas Kapellas and Michael Skilton and Louise Maple-Brown and Alex Brown and Bartold, {P. Mark} and Kerin O'Dea and D Celermajer and Lisa Jamieson",
    note = "NHMRC Grant #627100; #1004474; #605837; #1045800",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1353/hpu.2016.0040",
    language = "English",
    volume = "27",
    pages = "67--80",
    journal = "Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved",
    issn = "1049-2089",
    publisher = "The Johns Hopkins University Press",
    number = "1",

    }

    Amarasena, N, Kapellas, K, Skilton, M, Maple-Brown, L, Brown, A, Bartold, PM, O'Dea, K, Celermajer, D & Jamieson, L 2016, 'Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians', Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 67-80. https://doi.org/10.1353/hpu.2016.0040

    Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians. / Amarasena, Najith; Kapellas, Kostas; Skilton, Michael; Maple-Brown, Louise; Brown, Alex; Bartold, P. Mark; O'Dea, Kerin; Celermajer, D; Jamieson, Lisa.

    In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 27, No. 1, 2016, p. 67-80.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Factors Associated with Routine Dental Attendance among Aboriginal Australians

    AU - Amarasena, Najith

    AU - Kapellas, Kostas

    AU - Skilton, Michael

    AU - Maple-Brown, Louise

    AU - Brown, Alex

    AU - Bartold, P. Mark

    AU - O'Dea, Kerin

    AU - Celermajer, D

    AU - Jamieson, Lisa

    N1 - NHMRC Grant #627100; #1004474; #605837; #1045800

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Objectives: To determine factors associated with routine dental attendance in Aboriginal Australians. Methods: Data of 271 Aboriginal adults residing in Australia’s Northern Territory were used. Routine dental attendance was defined as last visiting a dentist less than one year ago or visiting a dentist for a check-up. Both bivariate and multivariable analytical techniques were used. Results: While 27% visited a dentist in the past year, 29% of these visited for a check-up. In bivariate analysis, being female, low psychological distress, and low clinical attachment loss (CAL) were associated with visiting a dentist within last year. Being aged younger than 39 years, male, no oral health impairment, being caries-free, low CAL, and low apolipoprotein B were associated with visiting for a check-up. Clinical attachment loss remained associated with visiting a dentist less than one year ago while being younger than 39 years and having no oral health impairment remained associated with usually visiting for a check-up in multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Younger age, no oral health impairment, and low CAL were associated with routine dental attendance among Indigenous Australians.

    AB - Objectives: To determine factors associated with routine dental attendance in Aboriginal Australians. Methods: Data of 271 Aboriginal adults residing in Australia’s Northern Territory were used. Routine dental attendance was defined as last visiting a dentist less than one year ago or visiting a dentist for a check-up. Both bivariate and multivariable analytical techniques were used. Results: While 27% visited a dentist in the past year, 29% of these visited for a check-up. In bivariate analysis, being female, low psychological distress, and low clinical attachment loss (CAL) were associated with visiting a dentist within last year. Being aged younger than 39 years, male, no oral health impairment, being caries-free, low CAL, and low apolipoprotein B were associated with visiting for a check-up. Clinical attachment loss remained associated with visiting a dentist less than one year ago while being younger than 39 years and having no oral health impairment remained associated with usually visiting for a check-up in multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Younger age, no oral health impairment, and low CAL were associated with routine dental attendance among Indigenous Australians.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957990840&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1353/hpu.2016.0040

    DO - 10.1353/hpu.2016.0040

    M3 - Article

    VL - 27

    SP - 67

    EP - 80

    JO - Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

    JF - Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved

    SN - 1049-2089

    IS - 1

    ER -