Fault lines or Songlines? The influence of remote Aboriginal communities in shaping social research priorities in child protection

Susan Moore

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    Abstract

    The first in a portfolio of publications the author identifies her social work experience within remote Australia as the catalyst for the development of the research topic, Keeping kids safe in remote Aboriginal communities: exploring community driven approaches for the protection of children from sexual abuse. Review and reform of Australia’s child protection systems rarely critique the theoretical foundations of the now overloaded, overwhelmed and fracturing system. The study explores in depth the issue of child sexual abuse through the eyes of Aboriginal people from remote communities of the Northern Territory (NT), those same communities impacted by the 2007 Australian Government Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER). It was not the first, nor has it been the last time that governments would conflate remote Aboriginal communities with child sexual abuse to justify a broader political agenda. The research aims to forge space within the existing western dominated knowledge base that underpins child sexual abuse to position and amplify remote Aboriginal voices. It is only through the lived experiences of this ancient culture that a strong foundation can be considered for the protection of children within remote areas from sexual abuse.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)607-625
    Number of pages19
    JournalFusion
    Issue number10
    Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2016

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