Four-year efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E and its interaction with malaria exposure

Ally Olotu, Greg Fegan, Juliana Wambua, George Nyangweso, Ken Awuondo, Amanda Leach, Marc Lievens, Didier Leboulleux, Patricia Njuguna, Norbert Peshu, Kevin Marsh, Philip Bejon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background: The candidate malaria vaccine RTS,S/AS01E has entered phase 3 trials, but data on long-term outcomes are limited.

    Methods: For 4 years, we followed children who had been randomly assigned, at 5 to 17 months of age, to receive three doses of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine (223 children) or rabies vaccine (224 controls). The end point was clinical malaria (temperature of ≥37.5°C and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia density of >2500 parasites per cubic millimeter). Each child’s exposure to malaria was estimated with the use of the distance-weighted local prevalence of malaria.

    Results: Over a period of 4 years, 118 of 223 children who received the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine and 138 of 224 of the controls had at least 1 episode of clinical malaria. Vaccine efficacies in the intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were 29.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.3 to 45.3; P=0.005) and 32.1% (95% CI, 11.6 to 47.8; P=0.004), respectively, calculated by Cox regression. Multiple episodes were common, with 551 and 618 malarial episodes in the RTS,S/AS01E and control groups, respectively; vaccine efficacies in the intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were 16.8% (95% CI, −8.6 to 36.3; P=0.18) and 24.3% (95% CI, 1.9 to 41.6; P=0.04), respectively, calculated by the Andersen–Gill extension of the Cox model. For every 100 vaccinated children, 65 cases of clinical malaria were averted. Vaccine efficacy declined over time (P=0.004) and with increasing exposure to malaria (P=0.001) in the per-protocol analysis. Vaccine efficacy was 43.6% (95% CI, 15.5 to 62.3) in the first year but was −0.4% (95% CI, −32.1 to 45.3) in the fourth year. Among children with a malaria-exposure index that was average or lower than average, the vaccine efficacy was 45.1% (95% CI, 11.3 to 66.0), but among children with a malaria-exposure index that was higher than average it was 15.9% (95% CI, −11.0 to 36.4).

    Conclusions: The efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine over the 4-year period was 16.8%. Efficacy declined over time and with increasing malaria exposure. (Funded by the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative and Wellcome Trust; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00872963.)

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1111-1120
    Number of pages10
    JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
    Volume368
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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  • Cite this

    Olotu, A., Fegan, G., Wambua, J., Nyangweso, G., Awuondo, K., Leach, A., Lievens, M., Leboulleux, D., Njuguna, P., Peshu, N., Marsh, K., & Bejon, P. (2013). Four-year efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E and its interaction with malaria exposure. New England Journal of Medicine, 368(12), 1111-1120. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1207564