From dragonflies to Facebook

Digital disruption creates new opportunities for wetland science and conservation

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper describes a project, initiated in 1998, to describe the diversity of dragonflies in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. Almost 20 years later, the development of an app and a citizen science project, 'Dragonflies and the Dry', has produced a large, image-based dataset on tropical dragonflies and demonstrated the value of digital media for communicating wetland science and biodiversity conservation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalPacific Conservation Biology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

dragonfly
wetland
national park
biodiversity
science
project

Cite this

@article{7391a07652254fe09b90e9a4cfcc4408,
title = "From dragonflies to Facebook: Digital disruption creates new opportunities for wetland science and conservation",
abstract = "This paper describes a project, initiated in 1998, to describe the diversity of dragonflies in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. Almost 20 years later, the development of an app and a citizen science project, 'Dragonflies and the Dry', has produced a large, image-based dataset on tropical dragonflies and demonstrated the value of digital media for communicating wetland science and biodiversity conservation.",
author = "Jenny Davis",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1071/PC18030",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "261--266",
journal = "Pacific Conservation Biology",
issn = "1038-2097",
publisher = "Surrey Beatty & Sons",
number = "3",

}

From dragonflies to Facebook : Digital disruption creates new opportunities for wetland science and conservation. / Davis, Jenny.

In: Pacific Conservation Biology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 09.07.2018, p. 261-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - From dragonflies to Facebook

T2 - Digital disruption creates new opportunities for wetland science and conservation

AU - Davis, Jenny

PY - 2018/7/9

Y1 - 2018/7/9

N2 - This paper describes a project, initiated in 1998, to describe the diversity of dragonflies in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. Almost 20 years later, the development of an app and a citizen science project, 'Dragonflies and the Dry', has produced a large, image-based dataset on tropical dragonflies and demonstrated the value of digital media for communicating wetland science and biodiversity conservation.

AB - This paper describes a project, initiated in 1998, to describe the diversity of dragonflies in Kakadu National Park, in northern Australia. Almost 20 years later, the development of an app and a citizen science project, 'Dragonflies and the Dry', has produced a large, image-based dataset on tropical dragonflies and demonstrated the value of digital media for communicating wetland science and biodiversity conservation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052304462&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1071/PC18030

DO - 10.1071/PC18030

M3 - Review article

VL - 24

SP - 261

EP - 266

JO - Pacific Conservation Biology

JF - Pacific Conservation Biology

SN - 1038-2097

IS - 3

ER -