From the Borderlands Editors

Adelle Sefton-Rowston, Glenn Morrison, Raelke Grimmer

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

    Abstract

    [No abstract available]
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number64.2
    Pages (from-to)140-142
    Number of pages3
    JournalWesterly
    Volume64
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    Westerly has converted the full backfile of Westerly (1956–) to electronic text, available to readers and researchers on the Westerly website, www.westerlymag.com.au. This work has been supported by a grant from the Cultural Fund of the Copyright Agency Limited.

    Funding Information:
    Westerly is published biannually with assistance from the State Government of WA by an investment in this project through the Culture and the Arts (WA) division of the Department of Local Government, Sport and Cultural Industries, and from the Australia Council for the Arts. The opinions expressed in Westerly are those of individual contributors and not of the Editors or Editorial Advisors.

    Funding Information:
    Phase one of the Borderlands project has been to gauge stakeholder interest in an NT journal, and to develop a business case based on market incentives and creative forces. Borderlands Magazine also aspires to offer something novel to creative practice by experimenting with the digital platform of art and storytelling. Phase two of the project is set to publish its first online pilot edition of Borderlands this month and a pilot print edition in the first half of 2020. The initiative is funded by Arts NT, Charles Darwin University, Creative Partnerships Australia and the Regional Arts Funds. By expanding the borders of Australian literary culture and celebrating authors and critics from within and beyond the NT, the magazine hopes to position itself at the vanguard of a Northern Australian literature. Writing from the NT hopes to inform inter-Australian perspectives by indexing (rather than trivialising) the NT’s unique social and political landscape, by promoting its linguistic diversity and providing a trenchant and complicated representation of marginalised groups. This NT feature gives hope to Borderlands’ own potential, and we encourage you to read more about us at http://borderlands.cdu.edu.au.

    Copyright:
    Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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