Gambling-Related Beliefs and Gambling Behaviour: Explaining Gambling Problems with the Theory of Planned Behaviour

Malcolm Flack, Mary Morris

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Investigating how gambling frequency and perceptions towards gambling relate to gambling problems has direct relevance for prevention and treatment programs. Accordingly, this study explored the relationship between a diverse group of gambling beliefs, the intention to gamble, gambling frequency, and gambling problems. To facilitate this, the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) was employed to model the influence of gambling attitudes (e.g., the expected emotional and financial outcomes from gambling), social norms (e.g., perceived approval and gambling behaviour of significant others) and cognitive biases (confidence in the ability to determine the outcome of gambling) on the intention to gamble, gambling frequency, and gambling problems. Two hundred and one volunteers completed a questionnaire that assessed these social-cognitive factors and gambling behaviours. Consistent with expectations, the path analysis revealed the TPB determinants predicted gambling frequency and gambling problems, respectively. Interestingly though, there was the direct path between the intention to gamble and gambling problems, and attitudes and gambling frequency. The potential implications for these findings are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)130-142
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
    Volume15
    Issue number1
    Early online date2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

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