Gender variations in waist circumference levels between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australian populations: A systematic review

Odewumi Adegbija, Zhiqiang Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To compare gender-specific waist circumference (WC) levels of Aboriginal Australians with non-Aboriginal Australians.

Methods: A systematic search on Medline, PubMed, EMBASE and Google Scholar databases was conducted to identify papers that reported gender-specific waist circumference (WC) estimates of participants from the age of 15 years and above among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Means and their 95% confidence intervals of gender differences in WC, height and weight were recorded or calculated where they were not provided. Gender-specific WC, height and weight mean estimates were pooled and the I2 statistic was used to test heterogeneity among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians.

Results: Of 17 selected cross-sectional studies, 9 focused on Aboriginal and 8 on non-Aboriginal Australians. Seven studies reported significantly higher WC estimates among indigenous females than males. On the other hand, non-indigenous males had significantly higher WC levels than females. Males had greater height and weight estimates than females in both groups.

Conclusion: Although indigenous women were shorter and had lower weight estimates, they had greater WC levels than indigenous men. This is the first systematic review to assess the gender-specific differences between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. The findings of this review warrant more efforts to understand and reduce the high prevalence of central obesity and related chronic diseases among Aboriginal women.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e513-e524
Number of pages12
JournalObesity Research and Clinical Practice
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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