Global Lung Function Initiative-2012 ‘other/mixed’ spirometry reference equation provides the best overall fit for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young adults

Tamara L. Blake, Anne B. Chang, Mark D. Chatfield, Julie M. Marchant, Margaret S. McElrea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Background and objective: Ethnic-specific reference equations are recommended when performing spirometry. In the absence of appropriate reference equations for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders (Indigenous), we determined whether any of the existing Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI)-2012 equations were suitable for use in Indigenous children/young adults.

    Methods: We performed spirometry on 1278 participants (3–25 years) who were identified as Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or ‘both’. Questionnaires and medical records were used to identify ‘healthy’ participants. GLI2012_DataConversion software was used to apply the ‘Caucasian’, ‘African-American’ and ‘other/mixed’ equations.

    Results: We included 930 healthy participants. Mean z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were lower than the Caucasian predicted values (range: −0.53 to −0.60) and higher than African-American (range: 0.70 to 0.78) but similar to other/mixed (range: 0.00 to 0.08). The distribution of healthy participants around the upper and lower limits of normal (~5%) fit well for the other/mixed equation compared to the Caucasian and African-American equations.

    Conclusion: Of the available GLI-2012 reference equations, the other/mixed reference equation provides the best overall fit for Indigenous Australian children and young adults (3–25 years). Healthy data from additional communities and adults around Australia will be required to confirm generalizability of findings.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalRespirology
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jul 2019

    Fingerprint

    Spirometry
    African Americans
    Young Adult
    Healthy Volunteers
    Lung
    Vital Capacity
    Forced Expiratory Volume
    Medical Records
    Software

    Cite this

    @article{6230db1b344d48638411d3a9e482432d,
    title = "Global Lung Function Initiative-2012 ‘other/mixed’ spirometry reference equation provides the best overall fit for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young adults",
    abstract = "Background and objective: Ethnic-specific reference equations are recommended when performing spirometry. In the absence of appropriate reference equations for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders (Indigenous), we determined whether any of the existing Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI)-2012 equations were suitable for use in Indigenous children/young adults. Methods: We performed spirometry on 1278 participants (3–25 years) who were identified as Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or ‘both’. Questionnaires and medical records were used to identify ‘healthy’ participants. GLI2012_DataConversion software was used to apply the ‘Caucasian’, ‘African-American’ and ‘other/mixed’ equations. Results: We included 930 healthy participants. Mean z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were lower than the Caucasian predicted values (range: −0.53 to −0.60) and higher than African-American (range: 0.70 to 0.78) but similar to other/mixed (range: 0.00 to 0.08). The distribution of healthy participants around the upper and lower limits of normal (~5{\%}) fit well for the other/mixed equation compared to the Caucasian and African-American equations. Conclusion: Of the available GLI-2012 reference equations, the other/mixed reference equation provides the best overall fit for Indigenous Australian children and young adults (3–25 years). Healthy data from additional communities and adults around Australia will be required to confirm generalizability of findings.",
    keywords = "ethnic groups, paediatrics, reference values, spirometry, standards",
    author = "Blake, {Tamara L.} and Chang, {Anne B.} and Chatfield, {Mark D.} and Marchant, {Julie M.} and McElrea, {Margaret S.}",
    year = "2019",
    month = "7",
    day = "24",
    doi = "10.1111/resp.13649",
    language = "English",
    pages = "1--8",
    journal = "Respirology",
    issn = "1323-7799",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

    }

    Global Lung Function Initiative-2012 ‘other/mixed’ spirometry reference equation provides the best overall fit for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young adults. / Blake, Tamara L.; Chang, Anne B.; Chatfield, Mark D.; Marchant, Julie M.; McElrea, Margaret S.

    In: Respirology, 24.07.2019, p. 1-8.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Global Lung Function Initiative-2012 ‘other/mixed’ spirometry reference equation provides the best overall fit for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and young adults

    AU - Blake, Tamara L.

    AU - Chang, Anne B.

    AU - Chatfield, Mark D.

    AU - Marchant, Julie M.

    AU - McElrea, Margaret S.

    PY - 2019/7/24

    Y1 - 2019/7/24

    N2 - Background and objective: Ethnic-specific reference equations are recommended when performing spirometry. In the absence of appropriate reference equations for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders (Indigenous), we determined whether any of the existing Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI)-2012 equations were suitable for use in Indigenous children/young adults. Methods: We performed spirometry on 1278 participants (3–25 years) who were identified as Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or ‘both’. Questionnaires and medical records were used to identify ‘healthy’ participants. GLI2012_DataConversion software was used to apply the ‘Caucasian’, ‘African-American’ and ‘other/mixed’ equations. Results: We included 930 healthy participants. Mean z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were lower than the Caucasian predicted values (range: −0.53 to −0.60) and higher than African-American (range: 0.70 to 0.78) but similar to other/mixed (range: 0.00 to 0.08). The distribution of healthy participants around the upper and lower limits of normal (~5%) fit well for the other/mixed equation compared to the Caucasian and African-American equations. Conclusion: Of the available GLI-2012 reference equations, the other/mixed reference equation provides the best overall fit for Indigenous Australian children and young adults (3–25 years). Healthy data from additional communities and adults around Australia will be required to confirm generalizability of findings.

    AB - Background and objective: Ethnic-specific reference equations are recommended when performing spirometry. In the absence of appropriate reference equations for Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders (Indigenous), we determined whether any of the existing Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI)-2012 equations were suitable for use in Indigenous children/young adults. Methods: We performed spirometry on 1278 participants (3–25 years) who were identified as Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or ‘both’. Questionnaires and medical records were used to identify ‘healthy’ participants. GLI2012_DataConversion software was used to apply the ‘Caucasian’, ‘African-American’ and ‘other/mixed’ equations. Results: We included 930 healthy participants. Mean z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were lower than the Caucasian predicted values (range: −0.53 to −0.60) and higher than African-American (range: 0.70 to 0.78) but similar to other/mixed (range: 0.00 to 0.08). The distribution of healthy participants around the upper and lower limits of normal (~5%) fit well for the other/mixed equation compared to the Caucasian and African-American equations. Conclusion: Of the available GLI-2012 reference equations, the other/mixed reference equation provides the best overall fit for Indigenous Australian children and young adults (3–25 years). Healthy data from additional communities and adults around Australia will be required to confirm generalizability of findings.

    KW - ethnic groups

    KW - paediatrics

    KW - reference values

    KW - spirometry

    KW - standards

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069827578&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/resp.13649

    DO - 10.1111/resp.13649

    M3 - Article

    SP - 1

    EP - 8

    JO - Respirology

    JF - Respirology

    SN - 1323-7799

    ER -