Group A streptococcal infections of the skin

molecular advances but limited therapeutic progress

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the sequencing of several Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) genomes have come major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus-associated diseases. This review focuses on group A Streptococcus skin infections and summarizes data published in the English language medical literature in 2004 and 2005. RECENT FINDINGS: Group A Streptococcus shows enormous and evolving molecular diversity driven by horizontal transmission between group A Streptococcus strains and between group A Streptococcus and other streptococci. Acquisition of prophages accounts for much of the diversity, conferring both virulence through phage-associated virulence factors and increased bacterial survival against host defences. Studies of group A Streptococcus isolates outside the US also question the generalizability of classic group A Streptococcus M serotype associations with specific disease entities such as acute rheumatic fever and necrotizing fasciitis. The distinction between throat and skin group A Streptococcus has become blurred. Although there have been few advances in treatment of group A Streptococcus skin infections, developments towards group A Streptococcus vaccines are promising. SUMMARY: The diversity of group A Streptococcus remains a challenge for vaccine development. As acute rheumatic fever and streptococcal pyoderma occur predominantly in disadvantaged populations, international funding support will be necessary for any group A Streptococcus vaccine to have a sustained impact on the global burden of disease. � 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)132-138
    Number of pages7
    JournalCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Streptococcal Infections
    Streptococcus
    Skin
    Therapeutics
    Vaccines
    Rheumatic Fever
    Pyoderma
    Prophages
    Necrotizing Fasciitis
    Streptococcus pyogenes
    Virulence Factors
    Vulnerable Populations
    Pharynx
    Infection
    Focus Groups
    Bacteriophages
    Virulence

    Cite this

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    title = "Group A streptococcal infections of the skin: molecular advances but limited therapeutic progress",
    abstract = "PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the sequencing of several Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) genomes have come major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus-associated diseases. This review focuses on group A Streptococcus skin infections and summarizes data published in the English language medical literature in 2004 and 2005. RECENT FINDINGS: Group A Streptococcus shows enormous and evolving molecular diversity driven by horizontal transmission between group A Streptococcus strains and between group A Streptococcus and other streptococci. Acquisition of prophages accounts for much of the diversity, conferring both virulence through phage-associated virulence factors and increased bacterial survival against host defences. Studies of group A Streptococcus isolates outside the US also question the generalizability of classic group A Streptococcus M serotype associations with specific disease entities such as acute rheumatic fever and necrotizing fasciitis. The distinction between throat and skin group A Streptococcus has become blurred. Although there have been few advances in treatment of group A Streptococcus skin infections, developments towards group A Streptococcus vaccines are promising. SUMMARY: The diversity of group A Streptococcus remains a challenge for vaccine development. As acute rheumatic fever and streptococcal pyoderma occur predominantly in disadvantaged populations, international funding support will be necessary for any group A Streptococcus vaccine to have a sustained impact on the global burden of disease. � 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.",
    keywords = "azithromycin, benzathine penicillin, cefazolin, chlorhexidine, clindamycin, fibronectin binding protein, flucloxacillin, fusidic acid, immunoglobulin G, M protein, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide nucleosidase, penicillin G, povidone iodine, pseudomonic acid, Streptococcus vaccine, streptolysin O, streptolysin S, virulence factor, allergic glomerulonephritis, bacterial virulence, cellulitis, disease transmission, host resistance, human, immune response, impetigo, necrotizing fasciitis, nonhuman, pathogenesis, prophage, pyoderma, review, rheumatic fever, sequence analysis, skin infection, Streptococcus group A, Streptococcus infection, Streptococcus pyogenes, bacterial skin disease, classification, genetics, microbiology, pathogenicity, virulence, Humans, Skin Diseases, Bacterial, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcal Vaccines, Virulence",
    author = "Bart Currie",
    year = "2006",
    language = "English",
    volume = "19",
    pages = "132--138",
    journal = "Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases",
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    }

    Group A streptococcal infections of the skin : molecular advances but limited therapeutic progress. / Currie, Bart.

    In: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, Vol. 19, No. 2, 2006, p. 132-138.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Group A streptococcal infections of the skin

    T2 - molecular advances but limited therapeutic progress

    AU - Currie, Bart

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the sequencing of several Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) genomes have come major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus-associated diseases. This review focuses on group A Streptococcus skin infections and summarizes data published in the English language medical literature in 2004 and 2005. RECENT FINDINGS: Group A Streptococcus shows enormous and evolving molecular diversity driven by horizontal transmission between group A Streptococcus strains and between group A Streptococcus and other streptococci. Acquisition of prophages accounts for much of the diversity, conferring both virulence through phage-associated virulence factors and increased bacterial survival against host defences. Studies of group A Streptococcus isolates outside the US also question the generalizability of classic group A Streptococcus M serotype associations with specific disease entities such as acute rheumatic fever and necrotizing fasciitis. The distinction between throat and skin group A Streptococcus has become blurred. Although there have been few advances in treatment of group A Streptococcus skin infections, developments towards group A Streptococcus vaccines are promising. SUMMARY: The diversity of group A Streptococcus remains a challenge for vaccine development. As acute rheumatic fever and streptococcal pyoderma occur predominantly in disadvantaged populations, international funding support will be necessary for any group A Streptococcus vaccine to have a sustained impact on the global burden of disease. � 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    AB - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: With the sequencing of several Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) genomes have come major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of group A Streptococcus-associated diseases. This review focuses on group A Streptococcus skin infections and summarizes data published in the English language medical literature in 2004 and 2005. RECENT FINDINGS: Group A Streptococcus shows enormous and evolving molecular diversity driven by horizontal transmission between group A Streptococcus strains and between group A Streptococcus and other streptococci. Acquisition of prophages accounts for much of the diversity, conferring both virulence through phage-associated virulence factors and increased bacterial survival against host defences. Studies of group A Streptococcus isolates outside the US also question the generalizability of classic group A Streptococcus M serotype associations with specific disease entities such as acute rheumatic fever and necrotizing fasciitis. The distinction between throat and skin group A Streptococcus has become blurred. Although there have been few advances in treatment of group A Streptococcus skin infections, developments towards group A Streptococcus vaccines are promising. SUMMARY: The diversity of group A Streptococcus remains a challenge for vaccine development. As acute rheumatic fever and streptococcal pyoderma occur predominantly in disadvantaged populations, international funding support will be necessary for any group A Streptococcus vaccine to have a sustained impact on the global burden of disease. � 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

    KW - azithromycin

    KW - benzathine penicillin

    KW - cefazolin

    KW - chlorhexidine

    KW - clindamycin

    KW - fibronectin binding protein

    KW - flucloxacillin

    KW - fusidic acid

    KW - immunoglobulin G

    KW - M protein

    KW - nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide nucleosidase

    KW - penicillin G

    KW - povidone iodine

    KW - pseudomonic acid

    KW - Streptococcus vaccine

    KW - streptolysin O

    KW - streptolysin S

    KW - virulence factor

    KW - allergic glomerulonephritis

    KW - bacterial virulence

    KW - cellulitis

    KW - disease transmission

    KW - host resistance

    KW - human

    KW - immune response

    KW - impetigo

    KW - necrotizing fasciitis

    KW - nonhuman

    KW - pathogenesis

    KW - prophage

    KW - pyoderma

    KW - review

    KW - rheumatic fever

    KW - sequence analysis

    KW - skin infection

    KW - Streptococcus group A

    KW - Streptococcus infection

    KW - Streptococcus pyogenes

    KW - bacterial skin disease

    KW - classification

    KW - genetics

    KW - microbiology

    KW - pathogenicity

    KW - virulence

    KW - Humans

    KW - Skin Diseases, Bacterial

    KW - Streptococcal Infections

    KW - Streptococcal Vaccines

    KW - Virulence

    M3 - Article

    VL - 19

    SP - 132

    EP - 138

    JO - Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

    JF - Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

    SN - 0951-7375

    IS - 2

    ER -