Group singing enhances positive affect in people with Parkinson’s Disease

Amee Baird, Romane Abell, William (Bill) Ford Thompson, Nicolas Bullot, Maggie Haertsch, Kerry Chalmers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    There is increasing evidence of the benefits of music, in particular singing, for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Current research has primarily focused on vocal or motor symptoms. Our aim was to examine the immediate emotional effects of group singing in people with PD, and whether the type of music sung (familiar vs. unfamiliar songs) moderates these effects. We also explored whether differences in music reward modulate the emotional effects of group singing in people with PD. 11 participants with PD completed the Positive And Negative Affect Schedule in three conditions: immediately after group singing (1) familiar songs,(2) unfamiliar songs, and (3) no singing. They also completed the Barcelona Music Reward Questionnaire. Positive affect scores were higher in the singing (collapsed across familiar and unfamiliar songs) than no-singing condition. There was no significant difference in positive affect scores between the two singing conditions (familiar/unfamiliar songs). There was a positive but not statistically significant relationship between music reward and positive affect scores after singing. This study documents enhanced positive affect in people with PD immediately after group singing. This has clinical implications for the use of singing as a therapeutic intervention in people with PD.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)13-17
    Number of pages5
    JournalMusic and Medicine
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

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  • Cite this

    Baird, A., Abell, R., Thompson, W. B. F., Bullot, N., Haertsch, M., & Chalmers, K. (2018). Group singing enhances positive affect in people with Parkinson’s Disease. Music and Medicine, 10(1), 13-17.