Growth outcomes for Australian Aboriginal children aged 11 years who were born with intrauterine growth retardation at term gestation

S Sayers, D Mackerras, S HALPIN, Gurmeet Singh

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Long-term poor growth outcomes are well documented for intrauterine growth-retarded babies (IUGR) in developed populations but there is a paucity of IUGR studies from disadvantaged populations where the greatest burden of IUGR occurs. Using a Northern Territory, Aboriginal cohort recruited at birth and followed up at a mean age of 11.4 years, comparisons of body size were made between children born at term who had been IUGR (n = 121) and those non-IUGR (n = 341), and between those IUGR babies who had an appropriate ponderal index at birth (n = 72) and those with a low ponderal index (n = 49). Compared with non-IUGR children, at follow-up the IUGR children were almost 2 cm shorter (P = 0.10), 4 kg lighter (P < 0.01) and their head circumferences were almost a 1 cm smaller (P < 0.01). For the 121 term IUGR children, there were no significant differences in growth outcomes according to ponderal index measures at birth. These findings from an Australian Aboriginal sample are consistent with other comparisons of IUGR and non-IUGR children in developed populations and suggest there may be no additional effects of IUGR on growth in childhood for disadvantaged populations similar to the Aboriginal population in the Northern Territory. � 2007 The Authors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)411-417
    Number of pages7
    JournalPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology
    Volume21
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    Fetal Growth Retardation
    Pregnancy
    Growth
    Northern Territory
    Population
    Parturition
    Vulnerable Populations
    Weights and Measures
    Body Size

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    title = "Growth outcomes for Australian Aboriginal children aged 11 years who were born with intrauterine growth retardation at term gestation",
    abstract = "Long-term poor growth outcomes are well documented for intrauterine growth-retarded babies (IUGR) in developed populations but there is a paucity of IUGR studies from disadvantaged populations where the greatest burden of IUGR occurs. Using a Northern Territory, Aboriginal cohort recruited at birth and followed up at a mean age of 11.4 years, comparisons of body size were made between children born at term who had been IUGR (n = 121) and those non-IUGR (n = 341), and between those IUGR babies who had an appropriate ponderal index at birth (n = 72) and those with a low ponderal index (n = 49). Compared with non-IUGR children, at follow-up the IUGR children were almost 2 cm shorter (P = 0.10), 4 kg lighter (P < 0.01) and their head circumferences were almost a 1 cm smaller (P < 0.01). For the 121 term IUGR children, there were no significant differences in growth outcomes according to ponderal index measures at birth. These findings from an Australian Aboriginal sample are consistent with other comparisons of IUGR and non-IUGR children in developed populations and suggest there may be no additional effects of IUGR on growth in childhood for disadvantaged populations similar to the Aboriginal population in the Northern Territory. � 2007 The Authors.",
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    author = "S Sayers and D Mackerras and S HALPIN and Gurmeet Singh",
    year = "2007",
    language = "English",
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    Growth outcomes for Australian Aboriginal children aged 11 years who were born with intrauterine growth retardation at term gestation. / Sayers, S; Mackerras, D; HALPIN, S; Singh, Gurmeet.

    In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2007, p. 411-417.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Growth outcomes for Australian Aboriginal children aged 11 years who were born with intrauterine growth retardation at term gestation

    AU - Sayers, S

    AU - Mackerras, D

    AU - HALPIN, S

    AU - Singh, Gurmeet

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - Long-term poor growth outcomes are well documented for intrauterine growth-retarded babies (IUGR) in developed populations but there is a paucity of IUGR studies from disadvantaged populations where the greatest burden of IUGR occurs. Using a Northern Territory, Aboriginal cohort recruited at birth and followed up at a mean age of 11.4 years, comparisons of body size were made between children born at term who had been IUGR (n = 121) and those non-IUGR (n = 341), and between those IUGR babies who had an appropriate ponderal index at birth (n = 72) and those with a low ponderal index (n = 49). Compared with non-IUGR children, at follow-up the IUGR children were almost 2 cm shorter (P = 0.10), 4 kg lighter (P < 0.01) and their head circumferences were almost a 1 cm smaller (P < 0.01). For the 121 term IUGR children, there were no significant differences in growth outcomes according to ponderal index measures at birth. These findings from an Australian Aboriginal sample are consistent with other comparisons of IUGR and non-IUGR children in developed populations and suggest there may be no additional effects of IUGR on growth in childhood for disadvantaged populations similar to the Aboriginal population in the Northern Territory. � 2007 The Authors.

    AB - Long-term poor growth outcomes are well documented for intrauterine growth-retarded babies (IUGR) in developed populations but there is a paucity of IUGR studies from disadvantaged populations where the greatest burden of IUGR occurs. Using a Northern Territory, Aboriginal cohort recruited at birth and followed up at a mean age of 11.4 years, comparisons of body size were made between children born at term who had been IUGR (n = 121) and those non-IUGR (n = 341), and between those IUGR babies who had an appropriate ponderal index at birth (n = 72) and those with a low ponderal index (n = 49). Compared with non-IUGR children, at follow-up the IUGR children were almost 2 cm shorter (P = 0.10), 4 kg lighter (P < 0.01) and their head circumferences were almost a 1 cm smaller (P < 0.01). For the 121 term IUGR children, there were no significant differences in growth outcomes according to ponderal index measures at birth. These findings from an Australian Aboriginal sample are consistent with other comparisons of IUGR and non-IUGR children in developed populations and suggest there may be no additional effects of IUGR on growth in childhood for disadvantaged populations similar to the Aboriginal population in the Northern Territory. � 2007 The Authors.

    KW - Aborigine

    KW - adolescent

    KW - anthropometry

    KW - article

    KW - controlled study

    KW - developing country

    KW - female

    KW - fetus growth

    KW - follow up

    KW - gestational age

    KW - growth curve

    KW - head circumference

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    KW - intrauterine growth retardation

    KW - major clinical study

    KW - male

    KW - population

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    KW - Cephalometry

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    KW - Cohort Studies

    KW - Demography

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    KW - Fetal Growth Retardation

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    KW - Humans

    KW - Infant

    KW - Infant, Newborn

    KW - Infant, Small for Gestational Age

    KW - Male

    KW - Northern Territory

    KW - Oceanic Ancestry Group

    KW - Pregnancy

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    JO - Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology

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    SN - 0269-5022

    IS - 5

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