Health professional networks as a vector for improving healthcare quality and safety

A systematic review

Frances Cunningham, Geetha Ranmuthugala, Jennifer Plumb, Andrew Georgiou, Johanna Westbrook, Jeffrey Braithwaite

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: While there is a considerable corpus of theoretical and empirical literature on networks within and outside of the health sector, multiple research questions are yet to be answered.

Objective: To conduct a systematic review of studies of professionals' network structures, identifying factors associated with network effectiveness and sustainability, particularly in relation to quality of care and patient safety.

Methods: The authors searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science and Business Source Premier from January 1995 to December 2009.

Results: A majority of the 26 unique studies identified used social network analysis to examine structural relationships in networks: structural relationships within and between networks, health professionals and their social context, health collaboratives and partnerships, and knowledge sharing networks. Key aspects of networks explored were administrative and clinical exchanges, network performance, integration, stability and influences on the quality of healthcare. More recent studies show that cohesive and collaborative health professional networks can facilitate the coordination of care and contribute to improving quality and safety of care. Structural network vulnerabilities include cliques, professional and gender homophily, and over-reliance on central agencies or individuals.

Conclusions: Effective professional networks employ natural structural network features (eg, bridges, brokers, density, centrality, degrees of separation, social capital, trust) in producing collaboratively oriented healthcare. This requires efficient transmission of information and social and professional interaction within and across networks. For those using networks to improve care, recurring success factors are understanding your network's characteristics, attending to its functioning and investing time in facilitating its improvement. Despite this, there is no guarantee that time spent on networks will necessarily improve patient care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-249
Number of pages11
JournalBMJ Quality and Safety
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Quality of Health Care
Safety
Health
Patient Safety
Interpersonal Relations
MEDLINE
Social Support
Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care
Research

Cite this

Cunningham, Frances ; Ranmuthugala, Geetha ; Plumb, Jennifer ; Georgiou, Andrew ; Westbrook, Johanna ; Braithwaite, Jeffrey. / Health professional networks as a vector for improving healthcare quality and safety : A systematic review. In: BMJ Quality and Safety. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 239-249.
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abstract = "Background: While there is a considerable corpus of theoretical and empirical literature on networks within and outside of the health sector, multiple research questions are yet to be answered.Objective: To conduct a systematic review of studies of professionals' network structures, identifying factors associated with network effectiveness and sustainability, particularly in relation to quality of care and patient safety.Methods: The authors searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science and Business Source Premier from January 1995 to December 2009.Results: A majority of the 26 unique studies identified used social network analysis to examine structural relationships in networks: structural relationships within and between networks, health professionals and their social context, health collaboratives and partnerships, and knowledge sharing networks. Key aspects of networks explored were administrative and clinical exchanges, network performance, integration, stability and influences on the quality of healthcare. More recent studies show that cohesive and collaborative health professional networks can facilitate the coordination of care and contribute to improving quality and safety of care. Structural network vulnerabilities include cliques, professional and gender homophily, and over-reliance on central agencies or individuals.Conclusions: Effective professional networks employ natural structural network features (eg, bridges, brokers, density, centrality, degrees of separation, social capital, trust) in producing collaboratively oriented healthcare. This requires efficient transmission of information and social and professional interaction within and across networks. For those using networks to improve care, recurring success factors are understanding your network's characteristics, attending to its functioning and investing time in facilitating its improvement. Despite this, there is no guarantee that time spent on networks will necessarily improve patient care.",
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Health professional networks as a vector for improving healthcare quality and safety : A systematic review. / Cunningham, Frances; Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Plumb, Jennifer; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey.

In: BMJ Quality and Safety, Vol. 21, No. 3, 2012, p. 239-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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