Healthy choice rewards: A feasibility trial of incentives to influence consumer food choices in a remote australian aboriginal community

Clare Brown, Cara Laws, Dympna Leonard, Sandy Campbell, Lea Merone, Melinda Hammond, Kani Thompson, Karla Canuto, Julie Brimblecombe

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Poor diet including inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians experience a disproportionate level of preventable chronic disease and successful strategies to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in remote areas to consume more fruit and vegetables can help address health disadvantage. Healthy Choice Rewards was a mixed methods study to investigate the feasibility of a monetary incentive: store vouchers, to promote fruit and vegetable purchasing in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Multiple challenges were identified in implementation, including limited nutrition workforce. Challenges related to the community store included frequent store closures and amended trading times, staffing issues and poor infrastructure to support fruit and vegetable promotion. No statistically significant increases in fruit or vegetable purchases were observed in the short time frame of this study. Despite this, community members reported high acceptability of the program, especially for women with children. Optimal implementation including, sufficient time and funding resources, with consideration of the most vulnerable could go some way to addressing inequities in food affordability for remote community residents.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number112
    JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume16
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 3 Jan 2019

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