Identification and characterization of Sarcoptes scabiei and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus glutathione S-transferases

Implication as a potential major allergen in crusted scabies

Annette Marie Dougall, Deborah Holt, Katja Fischer, Bart Currie, David J Kemp, Shelley Faye Walton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The Australian Centre for International and Tropical Health and Nutrition, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Northern Territory Clinical School, Flinders University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia The astigmatid mite Sarcoptes scabiei is the causative agent of scabies, a highly infectious parasitic disease of the skin. Although the mite causes marked hypersensitivity reactions, particularly in crusted (severe) scabies, little is known about the specific scabies mite molecules involved in such immunologic responses. We have identified six genes encoding scabies mite homologues of mu and delta-like glutathione 5-transferases (GSTs) as well as novel house dust mite GSTs. A mu class S. scabiei GST was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression system. The purified recombinant protein rSsGST01 reacted strongly with IgE and IgG4 in sera from crusted scabies patients. This response was not observed with control antigens or with ordinary scabies and uninfested patient sera. In addition, the specific IgE response to rSsGST01 did not correlate with the total IgE level of the patient. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the pathophysiology associated with crusted scabies. Copyright � 2005 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)977-984
    Number of pages8
    JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume73
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Sarcoptes scabiei
    Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
    Scabies
    Glutathione Transferase
    Allergens
    Northern Territory
    Queensland
    Mites
    Immunoglobulin E
    Communicable Diseases
    Emerging Communicable Diseases
    Pyroglyphidae
    Parasitic Diseases
    School Health Services
    Allergy and Immunology
    Serum
    Recombinant Proteins
    Biomedical Research
    Hypersensitivity
    Immunoglobulin G

    Cite this

    @article{d25580f40395471982adb316a126ba6f,
    title = "Identification and characterization of Sarcoptes scabiei and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus glutathione S-transferases: Implication as a potential major allergen in crusted scabies",
    abstract = "Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The Australian Centre for International and Tropical Health and Nutrition, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Northern Territory Clinical School, Flinders University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia The astigmatid mite Sarcoptes scabiei is the causative agent of scabies, a highly infectious parasitic disease of the skin. Although the mite causes marked hypersensitivity reactions, particularly in crusted (severe) scabies, little is known about the specific scabies mite molecules involved in such immunologic responses. We have identified six genes encoding scabies mite homologues of mu and delta-like glutathione 5-transferases (GSTs) as well as novel house dust mite GSTs. A mu class S. scabiei GST was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression system. The purified recombinant protein rSsGST01 reacted strongly with IgE and IgG4 in sera from crusted scabies patients. This response was not observed with control antigens or with ordinary scabies and uninfested patient sera. In addition, the specific IgE response to rSsGST01 did not correlate with the total IgE level of the patient. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the pathophysiology associated with crusted scabies. Copyright � 2005 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.",
    keywords = "allergen, glutathione transferase, glutathione transferase delta, glutathione transferase mu, immunoglobulin E, immunoglobulin G4, recombinant protein, unclassified drug, antibody specificity, antigen antibody reaction, article, controlled study, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, disease severity, gene expression system, human, hypersensitivity, immune response, immunoglobulin blood level, mite, molecular cloning, nonhuman, nucleotide sequence, parasitic skin disease, pathophysiology, prokaryote, Sarcoptes scabiei, scabies, sequence homology, Allergens, Animals, Escherichia coli, Glutathione Transferase, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Immediate, Immunoglobulin E, Immunoglobulin G, Molecular Sequence Data, Recombinant Proteins, Scabies, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Acari, Astigmata, Prokaryota, Psoroptes cervinus, Pyroglyphidae",
    author = "Dougall, {Annette Marie} and Deborah Holt and Katja Fischer and Bart Currie and Kemp, {David J} and Walton, {Shelley Faye}",
    year = "2005",
    language = "English",
    volume = "73",
    pages = "977--984",
    journal = "The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
    issn = "0002-9637",
    publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
    number = "5",

    }

    Identification and characterization of Sarcoptes scabiei and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus glutathione S-transferases : Implication as a potential major allergen in crusted scabies. / Dougall, Annette Marie; Holt, Deborah; Fischer, Katja; Currie, Bart; Kemp, David J; Walton, Shelley Faye.

    In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 73, No. 5, 2005, p. 977-984.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Identification and characterization of Sarcoptes scabiei and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus glutathione S-transferases

    T2 - Implication as a potential major allergen in crusted scabies

    AU - Dougall, Annette Marie

    AU - Holt, Deborah

    AU - Fischer, Katja

    AU - Currie, Bart

    AU - Kemp, David J

    AU - Walton, Shelley Faye

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The Australian Centre for International and Tropical Health and Nutrition, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Northern Territory Clinical School, Flinders University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia The astigmatid mite Sarcoptes scabiei is the causative agent of scabies, a highly infectious parasitic disease of the skin. Although the mite causes marked hypersensitivity reactions, particularly in crusted (severe) scabies, little is known about the specific scabies mite molecules involved in such immunologic responses. We have identified six genes encoding scabies mite homologues of mu and delta-like glutathione 5-transferases (GSTs) as well as novel house dust mite GSTs. A mu class S. scabiei GST was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression system. The purified recombinant protein rSsGST01 reacted strongly with IgE and IgG4 in sera from crusted scabies patients. This response was not observed with control antigens or with ordinary scabies and uninfested patient sera. In addition, the specific IgE response to rSsGST01 did not correlate with the total IgE level of the patient. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the pathophysiology associated with crusted scabies. Copyright � 2005 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

    AB - Tropical and Emerging Infectious Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The Australian Centre for International and Tropical Health and Nutrition, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Northern Territory Clinical School, Flinders University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia The astigmatid mite Sarcoptes scabiei is the causative agent of scabies, a highly infectious parasitic disease of the skin. Although the mite causes marked hypersensitivity reactions, particularly in crusted (severe) scabies, little is known about the specific scabies mite molecules involved in such immunologic responses. We have identified six genes encoding scabies mite homologues of mu and delta-like glutathione 5-transferases (GSTs) as well as novel house dust mite GSTs. A mu class S. scabiei GST was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression system. The purified recombinant protein rSsGST01 reacted strongly with IgE and IgG4 in sera from crusted scabies patients. This response was not observed with control antigens or with ordinary scabies and uninfested patient sera. In addition, the specific IgE response to rSsGST01 did not correlate with the total IgE level of the patient. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the pathophysiology associated with crusted scabies. Copyright � 2005 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

    KW - allergen

    KW - glutathione transferase

    KW - glutathione transferase delta

    KW - glutathione transferase mu

    KW - immunoglobulin E

    KW - immunoglobulin G4

    KW - recombinant protein

    KW - unclassified drug

    KW - antibody specificity

    KW - antigen antibody reaction

    KW - article

    KW - controlled study

    KW - Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    KW - disease severity

    KW - gene expression system

    KW - human

    KW - hypersensitivity

    KW - immune response

    KW - immunoglobulin blood level

    KW - mite

    KW - molecular cloning

    KW - nonhuman

    KW - nucleotide sequence

    KW - parasitic skin disease

    KW - pathophysiology

    KW - prokaryote

    KW - Sarcoptes scabiei

    KW - scabies

    KW - sequence homology

    KW - Allergens

    KW - Animals

    KW - Escherichia coli

    KW - Glutathione Transferase

    KW - Humans

    KW - Hypersensitivity, Immediate

    KW - Immunoglobulin E

    KW - Immunoglobulin G

    KW - Molecular Sequence Data

    KW - Recombinant Proteins

    KW - Scabies

    KW - Sequence Analysis, DNA

    KW - Acari

    KW - Astigmata

    KW - Prokaryota

    KW - Psoroptes cervinus

    KW - Pyroglyphidae

    M3 - Article

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    SP - 977

    EP - 984

    JO - The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

    JF - The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

    SN - 0002-9637

    IS - 5

    ER -