Immunisation coverage in Australian Indigenous children

Time to move the goal posts

Kerry-Ann O'Grady, V KRAUSE, Ross Andrews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Childhood immunisation coverage reported at 12 to <15 months and 2 years of age, may mask deficiencies in the timeliness of vaccines designed to protect against diseases in infancy. This study aimed to evaluate immunisation timeliness in Indigenous infants in the Northern Territory, Australia. Coverage was analysed at the date children turned 7, 13 and 18 months of age. By 7 months of age, 45.2% of children had completed the recommended schedule, increasing to 49.5% and 81.2% at 13 and 18 months of age, respectively. Immunisation performance benchmarks must focus on improving the timeliness in these children in the first year of life. � 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)307-312
    Number of pages6
    JournalVaccine
    Volume27
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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    Immunization
    immunization
    Northern Territory
    Benchmarking
    Masks
    Appointments and Schedules
    infancy
    Vaccines
    childhood
    vaccines

    Cite this

    O'Grady, Kerry-Ann ; KRAUSE, V ; Andrews, Ross. / Immunisation coverage in Australian Indigenous children : Time to move the goal posts. In: Vaccine. 2009 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 307-312.
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    Immunisation coverage in Australian Indigenous children : Time to move the goal posts. / O'Grady, Kerry-Ann; KRAUSE, V; Andrews, Ross.

    In: Vaccine, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2009, p. 307-312.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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