Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass

C BOUTLIS, Peter Fagan, D Gowda, M Lagog, C Mgone, M Bockarie, Nicholas Anstey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ?19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)862-865
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume187
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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