Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass

C BOUTLIS, Peter Fagan, D Gowda, M Lagog, C Mgone, M Bockarie, Nicholas Anstey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ?19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)862-865
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
    Volume187
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

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    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
    Plasmodium falciparum
    Immunoglobulin G
    Vaccination
    Parasitemia
    Malaria
    Antibody Formation
    Immunity
    Pharmacology

    Cite this

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    title = "Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass",
    abstract = "The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ?19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.",
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    author = "C BOUTLIS and Peter Fagan and D Gowda and M Lagog and C Mgone and M Bockarie and Nicholas Anstey",
    year = "2003",
    language = "English",
    volume = "187",
    pages = "862--865",
    journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
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    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass. / BOUTLIS, C; Fagan, Peter; Gowda, D; Lagog, M; Mgone, C; Bockarie, M; Anstey, Nicholas.

    In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 187, No. 5, 2003, p. 862-865.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to Plasmodium falciparum glycosylphosphatidylinositols are short-lived and predominantly of the IgG3 subclass

    AU - BOUTLIS, C

    AU - Fagan, Peter

    AU - Gowda, D

    AU - Lagog, M

    AU - Mgone, C

    AU - Bockarie, M

    AU - Anstey, Nicholas

    PY - 2003

    Y1 - 2003

    N2 - The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ?19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.

    AB - The induction of neutralizing immunity to Plasmodium falciparum toxins by vaccination has been proposed as a preventive strategy to limit the severity of malaria. For this approach to be successful, generation of a sustained immune response would be necessary. This study shows that immunoglobulin G (IgG)-subclass responses elicited by the proposed P. falciparum toxin glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) in Papua New Guinean subjects 5-60 years old predominantly involve IgG3, with a lesser contribution from IgG1 and an absence of IgG2 and IgG4. IgG3 levels declined sharply within 6 weeks of pharmacological clearance of parasitemia in all subjects, whereas a significant decrease in IgG1 levels was seen only in subjects ?19 years old. Because the natural antibody response to P. falciparum GPIs is skewed toward the short-lived IgG3 subclass, a vaccination strategy with GPI analogues would likely require augmentation by costimulatory molecules, to induce a more persistent anti-GPI response.

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