Impact of Centre-of-Mass Acceleration on Perceived Exertion, the Metabolic Equivalent and Heart Rate Reserve in Triathlete Spin Cycling: A Pilot Study

Stuart A. Evans, Daniel A. James, David Rowlands, James B. Lee

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Abstract

Indoor spin cycling has gained popularity as a training modality for triathletes. Part of its appeal is that it can form a component of a structured periodised training program and provide an alternative to outdoor cycling. Indices of physiological components (i.e., the metabolic equivalent, caloric cost, perceived exertion) and changes in the body position can be inferred by wearable technology such as an accelerometer. This pilot study aimed to investigate the relationship between the rating of perceived exertion, heart rate reserve, and the metabolic equivalent between the whole body centre of mass acceleration using a sacrum mounted triaxial accelerometer during 20 minutes of 6 varied power conditions of indoor spin cycling. Compared with other conditions, cycling at a steady state (>152-205 W) resulted in extremely large effects (> 0.9) in mediolateral acceleration and the rating of perceived exertion (p < 0.0001). The relationship between the body position (aerodynamic to drops) induced significant changes in anteroposterior acceleration magnitude (p < 0.0001), although moving from drops to the aerodynamic position was not significant despite a large increase in heart rate reserve and extremely large effects of perceived exertion. The rating of perceived exertion scale and the metabolic equivalent comparative to the whole body centre of mass acceleration magnitude and power displayed a strong correlation (r = 0.865). An individually determined whole body centre of mass accelerations combined with perceived exertion, the metabolic equivalent and heart rate reserve could potentially contribute to improved indoor triathlete spin cycling performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-52
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Human Kinetics
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2022

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