Implications of gendered environmental knowledge in water allocation processes in central Australia

Linda A. Wirf, April Campbell, Naomi Rea

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

    Abstract

    The existence of gendered knowledge has been identified as a significant feature of Indigenous Australian culture, and the importance of considering the implications of gendered environmental knowledge in collaborative cross-cultural natural resource management has been highlighted. There is a lack of case studies that demonstrate how Indigenous women's knowledge and laws can be provided for in resource management contexts. From collaborative research with Anmatyerr women in central Australia, we discuss the implications of gender bias in relation to gendered knowledge in natural and cultural resource management, with a specific focus on Anmatyerr women's involvement in providing inputs about the cultural values of water within water allocation planning processes. This research highlights Anmatyerr women's own perspectives of their roles in contemporary contexts and identifies the existence of cultural change and continuity in relation to rights and responsibilities around water.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)505-518
    Number of pages14
    JournalGender, Place and Culture
    Volume15
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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