In search of a decolonised military: Māori cultural learning experiences in the New Zealand Defence Force

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Māori people contribute significantly to the New Zealand Defence Force. Māori indigenous knowledge, however, did not feature in military curricula until recently. It was a common expectation that Māori personnel would conform to the dominant Western worldview, which often meant sacrificing indigenous identity. The introduction of the Service bicultural policies has paved the way for significant change in military education practices in the twenty-first century. This paper showcases the Māori cultural learning experiences of 34 members from the New Zealand Defence Force as they reflect on their experiences within the contemporary context of a military education and training environment, and the broader context of a decolonising society. This study argues that the inclusion of indigenous knowledge systems in military curricula improves the learning experiences of all members. Themes relating to individual development and improved organisational morale emerged that were found to be directly or indirectly attributed to the inclusion of Māori cultural training. The study is grounded in a multicultural military organisation, operating within a nation seeking to establish a bicultural co-equal partnership between Māori, the tangata whenua, original inhabitants, and non-Māori, the kaiwhakanoho whenua, or settler population, of New Zealand.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)47-58
    Number of pages12
    JournalKotuitui
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In search of a decolonised military: Māori cultural learning experiences in the New Zealand Defence Force'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this