Infant Behavior and Competence Following Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster

The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study

Belinda Lequertier, Gabrielle Simcock, Vanessa E. Cobham, Sue Kildea, Suzanne King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study utilized a natural disaster to investigate the effects of prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) arising from exposure to a severe flood on maternally reported infant social–emotional and behavioral outcomes at 16 months, along with potential moderation by infant sex and gestational timing of flood exposure. Women pregnant during the Queensland floods in January 2011 completed measures of flood-related objective hardship and posttraumatic stress (PTS). At 16 months postpartum, mothers completed measures describing depressive symptoms and infant social–emotional and behavioral problems (n = 123) and competence (n = 125). Greater maternal PTS symptoms were associated with reduced infant competence. A sex difference in infant behavioral problems emerged at higher levels of maternal objective hardship and PTS; boys had significantly more behavioral problems than girls. Additionally, greater PTS was associated with more behavioral problems in boys; however, this effect was attenuated by adjustment for maternal depressive symptoms. No main effects or interactions with gestational timing were found. Findings highlight specificity in the relationships between PNMS components and infant outcomes and demonstrate that the effects of PNMS exposure on behavior may be evident as early as infancy. Implications for the support of families exposed to a natural disaster during pregnancy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)411-432
Number of pages22
JournalInfancy
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Infant Behavior
Queensland
Disasters
Mental Competency
Mothers
Depression
Maternal Exposure
Sex Characteristics
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy
Problem Behavior

Cite this

Lequertier, Belinda ; Simcock, Gabrielle ; Cobham, Vanessa E. ; Kildea, Sue ; King, Suzanne. / Infant Behavior and Competence Following Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster : The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. In: Infancy. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 411-432.
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Infant Behavior and Competence Following Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster : The QF2011 Queensland Flood Study. / Lequertier, Belinda; Simcock, Gabrielle; Cobham, Vanessa E.; Kildea, Sue; King, Suzanne.

In: Infancy, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 411-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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