Inquiry-based teaching and learning: What's in a name?

M MAHONY, Helen Wozniak, F EVERINGHAM, B REID, A POULOS

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in Proceedings

Abstract

This paper reports a research and development study on inquiry-based teaching and learning. Its genesis was in a faculty commitment to inquiry-based learning as a theme in undergraduate curriculum reform in the allied health sciences in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. A working party charged with overseeing a project to produce resources to support staff in their on-going implementation of this theme discovered that members could not themselves agree on terms about concepts and the relationships among them in this area. Subsequent investigation of recent literature and a survey of university health sciences professional educators in Australia and New Zealand confirmed that this lack of agreement is a widespread phenomenon. In this paper we report on our findings and conclude that it is not the range of concept labels but rather the multi-dimensional nature of the concept of inquiry-based teaching and learning which can cause ambiguity and conflicting interpretations in academic dialogue and practice. This limits opportunities for identifying and disseminating good practice in inquiry-based teaching and learning.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLearning for an Unknown Future
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 26th HERDSA Annual Conference
Place of PublicationMilperra
PublisherHigher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)0908557558
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
Event26th HERDSA Annual Conference: Learning for an Unknown Future - Christchurch, New Zealand
Duration: 6 Jul 20039 Jul 2003

Conference

Conference26th HERDSA Annual Conference: Learning for an Unknown Future
Period6/07/039/07/03

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