Insiders or outsiders? Mental health service users' journeys towards full citizenship

Helen P. Hamer, Mary Finlayson, Helen Warren

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The present study explores the journeys towards full citizenship for those using mental health services as they lobbied to be included as full citizens with the same rights and responsibilities as others in society. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 service users, five government representatives, and seven registered mental health nurses. A conceptual framework of citizenship containing four domains - the extent, content, depth and acts of citizenship - was used to analyse the data. This paper reports the findings from the service users' data in the first domain, the extent of citizenship, defined as the rules and norms of inclusion and exclusion. The degree to which the service user participants were accepted as full citizens with the same civil, political, and social rights as others was contingent on their ability to adopt their society's rules and norms and appear as 'normal' citizens. Participants often experienced being 'othered' and excluded from the many rights and responsibilities of citizenship due to society's perception that service users lack certain attributes of normal, productive citizens. Participants reported that being labelled with a mental illness led to them being marginalized and ostracized, thus placing conditions and barriers on their citizenship status. Findings show that in response to experiencing conditional citizenship, participants shaped their behaviour to assimilate with other citizens. As well, they engaged in practices of inclusion to challenge and broaden the social rules and norms in order to be accepted without disavowing their differences. 

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)203-211
    Number of pages9
    JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
    Volume23
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

    Fingerprint

    Mental Health Services
    Aptitude
    Mental Health
    Nurses
    Interviews

    Cite this

    Hamer, Helen P. ; Finlayson, Mary ; Warren, Helen. / Insiders or outsiders? Mental health service users' journeys towards full citizenship. In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 203-211.
    @article{6b09be9b9b684543af6238a23c914728,
    title = "Insiders or outsiders? Mental health service users' journeys towards full citizenship",
    abstract = "The present study explores the journeys towards full citizenship for those using mental health services as they lobbied to be included as full citizens with the same rights and responsibilities as others in society. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 service users, five government representatives, and seven registered mental health nurses. A conceptual framework of citizenship containing four domains - the extent, content, depth and acts of citizenship - was used to analyse the data. This paper reports the findings from the service users' data in the first domain, the extent of citizenship, defined as the rules and norms of inclusion and exclusion. The degree to which the service user participants were accepted as full citizens with the same civil, political, and social rights as others was contingent on their ability to adopt their society's rules and norms and appear as 'normal' citizens. Participants often experienced being 'othered' and excluded from the many rights and responsibilities of citizenship due to society's perception that service users lack certain attributes of normal, productive citizens. Participants reported that being labelled with a mental illness led to them being marginalized and ostracized, thus placing conditions and barriers on their citizenship status. Findings show that in response to experiencing conditional citizenship, participants shaped their behaviour to assimilate with other citizens. As well, they engaged in practices of inclusion to challenge and broaden the social rules and norms in order to be accepted without disavowing their differences. ",
    keywords = "adult, aged, female, human, male, Mental Disorders, mental health service, middle aged, psychology, social exclusion, social isolation, socialization, utilization, young adult, Adult, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Health Services, Middle Aged, Social Isolation, Social Marginalization, Socialization, Young Adult",
    author = "Hamer, {Helen P.} and Mary Finlayson and Helen Warren",
    year = "2014",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.1111/inm.12046",
    language = "English",
    volume = "23",
    pages = "203--211",
    journal = "International Journal of Mental Health Nursing",
    issn = "1324-3780",
    publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
    number = "3",

    }

    Insiders or outsiders? Mental health service users' journeys towards full citizenship. / Hamer, Helen P.; Finlayson, Mary; Warren, Helen.

    In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 23, No. 3, 06.2014, p. 203-211.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Insiders or outsiders? Mental health service users' journeys towards full citizenship

    AU - Hamer, Helen P.

    AU - Finlayson, Mary

    AU - Warren, Helen

    PY - 2014/6

    Y1 - 2014/6

    N2 - The present study explores the journeys towards full citizenship for those using mental health services as they lobbied to be included as full citizens with the same rights and responsibilities as others in society. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 service users, five government representatives, and seven registered mental health nurses. A conceptual framework of citizenship containing four domains - the extent, content, depth and acts of citizenship - was used to analyse the data. This paper reports the findings from the service users' data in the first domain, the extent of citizenship, defined as the rules and norms of inclusion and exclusion. The degree to which the service user participants were accepted as full citizens with the same civil, political, and social rights as others was contingent on their ability to adopt their society's rules and norms and appear as 'normal' citizens. Participants often experienced being 'othered' and excluded from the many rights and responsibilities of citizenship due to society's perception that service users lack certain attributes of normal, productive citizens. Participants reported that being labelled with a mental illness led to them being marginalized and ostracized, thus placing conditions and barriers on their citizenship status. Findings show that in response to experiencing conditional citizenship, participants shaped their behaviour to assimilate with other citizens. As well, they engaged in practices of inclusion to challenge and broaden the social rules and norms in order to be accepted without disavowing their differences. 

    AB - The present study explores the journeys towards full citizenship for those using mental health services as they lobbied to be included as full citizens with the same rights and responsibilities as others in society. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 service users, five government representatives, and seven registered mental health nurses. A conceptual framework of citizenship containing four domains - the extent, content, depth and acts of citizenship - was used to analyse the data. This paper reports the findings from the service users' data in the first domain, the extent of citizenship, defined as the rules and norms of inclusion and exclusion. The degree to which the service user participants were accepted as full citizens with the same civil, political, and social rights as others was contingent on their ability to adopt their society's rules and norms and appear as 'normal' citizens. Participants often experienced being 'othered' and excluded from the many rights and responsibilities of citizenship due to society's perception that service users lack certain attributes of normal, productive citizens. Participants reported that being labelled with a mental illness led to them being marginalized and ostracized, thus placing conditions and barriers on their citizenship status. Findings show that in response to experiencing conditional citizenship, participants shaped their behaviour to assimilate with other citizens. As well, they engaged in practices of inclusion to challenge and broaden the social rules and norms in order to be accepted without disavowing their differences. 

    KW - adult

    KW - aged

    KW - female

    KW - human

    KW - male

    KW - Mental Disorders

    KW - mental health service

    KW - middle aged

    KW - psychology

    KW - social exclusion

    KW - social isolation

    KW - socialization

    KW - utilization

    KW - young adult

    KW - Adult

    KW - Aged

    KW - Female

    KW - Humans

    KW - Male

    KW - Mental Health Services

    KW - Middle Aged

    KW - Social Isolation

    KW - Social Marginalization

    KW - Socialization

    KW - Young Adult

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84898442693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/inm.12046

    DO - 10.1111/inm.12046

    M3 - Article

    VL - 23

    SP - 203

    EP - 211

    JO - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

    JF - International Journal of Mental Health Nursing

    SN - 1324-3780

    IS - 3

    ER -