Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera

Formicidae) as a key element

Renkang Peng, Keith Christian

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Mango is the most important commercial fruit crop in the Northern Territory, Australia. Growers currently rely on insecticides to control insect pests of mango, resulting in environmental and social problems. To reduce dependency on insecticides, a suitable IPM programme is needed. Previous work showed that weaver ants can control the major mango insect pests, but they protect soft scales, damage fruits by their formic acid and annoy operatives during fruit harvest. Further research addressing these constraints showed that certain chemicals can reduce soft scale numbers without seriously affecting weaver ant populations, the isolation of ant colonies reduces fruit damage by formic acid, and water spray reduces the ant activity during harvest. A field experiment with two treatments, weaver ants plus soft chemicals (WPS) and weaver ants plus chemical insecticides (CI), was conducted at Howard Springs in the Northern Territory. In two out of the three years, the yield of first class fruit was 20% higher in WTS than in CL This was mostly explained by lower, insect pest damage, lower incidence of mango scab disease and lower infestation of lenticels in WPS. Trees in WPS produced significantly more fruits than in CI in 2002. Overall, trees in WPS resulted in a profit of A$14.50/tree per year, but trees in CI produced only A$8.38/tree per year. During harvest, farmers experienced only minor problems with ant disturbance. An IPM model using weaver ants as a key element is discussed with respect to 'organic' production. � 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)149-155
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Pest Management
    Volume51
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    Oecophylla smaragdina
    Northern Territory
    integrated pest management
    mangoes
    Formicidae
    orchards
    Hymenoptera
    insecticides
    insect pests
    Coccidae
    formic acid
    plant damage
    fruits
    scab diseases
    social problems
    fruit crops
    organic production
    profits and margins
    growers
    farmers

    Cite this

    @article{60b6298cc6544db49ab225389ea73993,
    title = "Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as a key element",
    abstract = "Mango is the most important commercial fruit crop in the Northern Territory, Australia. Growers currently rely on insecticides to control insect pests of mango, resulting in environmental and social problems. To reduce dependency on insecticides, a suitable IPM programme is needed. Previous work showed that weaver ants can control the major mango insect pests, but they protect soft scales, damage fruits by their formic acid and annoy operatives during fruit harvest. Further research addressing these constraints showed that certain chemicals can reduce soft scale numbers without seriously affecting weaver ant populations, the isolation of ant colonies reduces fruit damage by formic acid, and water spray reduces the ant activity during harvest. A field experiment with two treatments, weaver ants plus soft chemicals (WPS) and weaver ants plus chemical insecticides (CI), was conducted at Howard Springs in the Northern Territory. In two out of the three years, the yield of first class fruit was 20{\%} higher in WTS than in CL This was mostly explained by lower, insect pest damage, lower incidence of mango scab disease and lower infestation of lenticels in WPS. Trees in WPS produced significantly more fruits than in CI in 2002. Overall, trees in WPS resulted in a profit of A$14.50/tree per year, but trees in CI produced only A$8.38/tree per year. During harvest, farmers experienced only minor problems with ant disturbance. An IPM model using weaver ants as a key element is discussed with respect to 'organic' production. � 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.",
    keywords = "ant, biocontrol agent, integrated pest management, pest control, Australasia, Australia, Eastern Hemisphere, Northern Territory, World, Coccidae, Formicidae, Hymenoptera, Insecta, Mangifera indica, Oecophylla smaragdina, Oecophyllini",
    author = "Renkang Peng and Keith Christian",
    year = "2005",
    language = "English",
    volume = "51",
    pages = "149--155",
    journal = "International Journal of Pest Management",
    issn = "0030-7793",
    publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
    number = "2",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Integrated pest management in mango orchards in the Northern Territory Australia, using the weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, (Hymenoptera

    T2 - Formicidae) as a key element

    AU - Peng, Renkang

    AU - Christian, Keith

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - Mango is the most important commercial fruit crop in the Northern Territory, Australia. Growers currently rely on insecticides to control insect pests of mango, resulting in environmental and social problems. To reduce dependency on insecticides, a suitable IPM programme is needed. Previous work showed that weaver ants can control the major mango insect pests, but they protect soft scales, damage fruits by their formic acid and annoy operatives during fruit harvest. Further research addressing these constraints showed that certain chemicals can reduce soft scale numbers without seriously affecting weaver ant populations, the isolation of ant colonies reduces fruit damage by formic acid, and water spray reduces the ant activity during harvest. A field experiment with two treatments, weaver ants plus soft chemicals (WPS) and weaver ants plus chemical insecticides (CI), was conducted at Howard Springs in the Northern Territory. In two out of the three years, the yield of first class fruit was 20% higher in WTS than in CL This was mostly explained by lower, insect pest damage, lower incidence of mango scab disease and lower infestation of lenticels in WPS. Trees in WPS produced significantly more fruits than in CI in 2002. Overall, trees in WPS resulted in a profit of A$14.50/tree per year, but trees in CI produced only A$8.38/tree per year. During harvest, farmers experienced only minor problems with ant disturbance. An IPM model using weaver ants as a key element is discussed with respect to 'organic' production. � 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.

    AB - Mango is the most important commercial fruit crop in the Northern Territory, Australia. Growers currently rely on insecticides to control insect pests of mango, resulting in environmental and social problems. To reduce dependency on insecticides, a suitable IPM programme is needed. Previous work showed that weaver ants can control the major mango insect pests, but they protect soft scales, damage fruits by their formic acid and annoy operatives during fruit harvest. Further research addressing these constraints showed that certain chemicals can reduce soft scale numbers without seriously affecting weaver ant populations, the isolation of ant colonies reduces fruit damage by formic acid, and water spray reduces the ant activity during harvest. A field experiment with two treatments, weaver ants plus soft chemicals (WPS) and weaver ants plus chemical insecticides (CI), was conducted at Howard Springs in the Northern Territory. In two out of the three years, the yield of first class fruit was 20% higher in WTS than in CL This was mostly explained by lower, insect pest damage, lower incidence of mango scab disease and lower infestation of lenticels in WPS. Trees in WPS produced significantly more fruits than in CI in 2002. Overall, trees in WPS resulted in a profit of A$14.50/tree per year, but trees in CI produced only A$8.38/tree per year. During harvest, farmers experienced only minor problems with ant disturbance. An IPM model using weaver ants as a key element is discussed with respect to 'organic' production. � 2005 Taylor & Francis Group Ltd.

    KW - ant

    KW - biocontrol agent

    KW - integrated pest management

    KW - pest control

    KW - Australasia

    KW - Australia

    KW - Eastern Hemisphere

    KW - Northern Territory

    KW - World

    KW - Coccidae

    KW - Formicidae

    KW - Hymenoptera

    KW - Insecta

    KW - Mangifera indica

    KW - Oecophylla smaragdina

    KW - Oecophyllini

    M3 - Article

    VL - 51

    SP - 149

    EP - 155

    JO - International Journal of Pest Management

    JF - International Journal of Pest Management

    SN - 0030-7793

    IS - 2

    ER -