Internal Return Migration and the Northern Territory: New Migration Analysis for Understanding Population Prospects for Sparsely Populated Areas

James Thurmer, Andrew Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Australian internal migration is characterised by increasing temporariness. In addition, a greater number of people undertaking cross-jurisdictional migration are those who have already moved more than once. However, most research and discussion on migration does not examine the characteristics of these multiple-movers. Regional and peripheral areas such as the Northern Territory of Australia are becoming increasingly reliant on short-term and temporary migration to maintain population growth overall. Consequently, a better understanding of the differences between first-time migrants and short-term migrants is required for policies aiming to attract and retain migrants. Differentiating the characteristics of these migrant groups is also vital to attracting-back former, or repeat, residents. In this research we develop and apply a new method for examining the migration behaviours of a region’s former residents and their likelihood of returning, using the Northern Territory of Australia as the basis. Results demonstrate policy and planning can be enhanced by distinguishing internal migrant types and that the methods we have developed to do so are purposeful as well as replicable for other regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Early online date28 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Sep 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Internal Return Migration and the Northern Territory: New Migration Analysis for Understanding Population Prospects for Sparsely Populated Areas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this