International cybercrime, transnational evidence gathering and the challenges in Australia

finding the delicate balance

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    Abstract

    Digital evidence is a challenging aspect of cybercrime. The fact that the internet knows no jurisdictional boundaries stretches this difficulty a step further as one will then have to deal with the jurisdictional issues in the transnational gathering of evidence in digital crimes. In Australia, the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 was amended in 2012 by the Cybercrime Legislation Amendment Act 2012. The Act allows Australia to accede to the Council of Europe's Convention on Cybercrime. The Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 has been criticised due to privacy concerns as there are no restrictions on the use of information requested by foreign countries. This article examines the challenges in transnational evidence gathering in cybercrime in Australian law and its challenges internationally.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)177-198
    Number of pages22
    JournalInternational Journal of Information and Communication Technology
    Volume9
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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