International partnerships and the development of a Sister Hospital Programme

Diane Brown, G Rickard, Komang Mustriwati, Jo Seiler

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: Despite some progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals, there are still major discrepancies in health service provision between developed and developing countries. Nurses are key players to improving the quality of health services. Increasingly, partnerships are being initiated between nurses of different countries to enable those working in developing countries to improve standards of clinical care. 

    Aim: This paper describes a partnership between two major teaching hospitals: one in Indonesia and one in Australia, designed to assist in improving standards of clinical care within the Indonesian hospital. 

    Methods: The nature of the partnership, conceptualized as a Sister Hospital Program, is described. The processes and outcomes of the pilot programme conducted in 2011 are outlined. A brief description of the methods used to gain financial support from the Northern Territory Government is provided. The programme offered a skills development programme for selected staff from Sanglah General Hospital in Bali at Royal Darwin Hospital in northern Australia. Instruments: The paper uses Green's PROCEED-PRECEDE framework both to describe and evaluate the pilot programme. 

    Results: The skills development programme was enthusiastically evaluated by staff from both hospitals and has led to major changes in the management of patients within the Emergency Department of Sanglah General Hospital. The success of the pilot has resulted in longer-term funding by the Australian government. 

    Wider policy outcomes: The partnership model described in the paper is submitted as a possible framework for other swishing to build long-term and collaborative relationships between nurses of different nations. 

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)45-51
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Nursing Review
    Volume60
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

    Fingerprint

    Siblings
    Nurses
    Standard of Care
    General Hospitals
    Developing Countries
    Health Services
    Northern Territory
    Financial Support
    Indonesia
    Developed Countries
    Teaching Hospitals
    Hospital Emergency Service

    Cite this

    Brown, Diane ; Rickard, G ; Mustriwati, Komang ; Seiler, Jo. / International partnerships and the development of a Sister Hospital Programme. In: International Nursing Review. 2013 ; Vol. 60. pp. 45-51.
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    International partnerships and the development of a Sister Hospital Programme. / Brown, Diane; Rickard, G; Mustriwati, Komang; Seiler, Jo.

    In: International Nursing Review, Vol. 60, 03.2013, p. 45-51.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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