Involving stakeholders in the evaluation of community alcohol projects: finding a balance between subjective insight and objective facts

Kevin Boots, Richard Midford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The role played by key community representatives in the evaluation of community alcohol projects differs according to the evaluation paradigm adopted. In evaluations that adopt a positivist, experimental design they are cast in the role of independent informants. In post-positivist evaluations they are seen as having an interest in the evaluation and accordingly are considered active stakeholders. However, the degree to which stakeholders can be actively engaged in an evaluation varies considerably along a number of dimensions. Four dimensions of the stakeholder role—stakeholder inclusiveness, participation mode, participation frequency, and evaluation role—are examined in the context of eight evaluation theories. This is integrated into a model that links these dimensions to an object-subject continuum of stakeholder involvement. The model facilitates systematic consideration of these dimensions and will assist evaluators in achieving their desired balance of subjective insight and objective fact.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1955-1969
Number of pages15
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume42
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

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alcohol
stakeholder
Alcohols
evaluation
community
participation
Research Design
paradigm

Cite this

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Involving stakeholders in the evaluation of community alcohol projects : finding a balance between subjective insight and objective facts. / Boots, Kevin; Midford, Richard.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 42, No. 12, 01.01.2007, p. 1955-1969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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