Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored

Lynne Eagle, Stephan Dahl, David Low

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

While vaccines have reduced the occurrence of many diseases, concerns are growing regarding the percentage of people who regard vaccines as unnecessary or unsafe. Using the examples of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) and human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines, we examine the factors that may inhibit vaccine uptake and discuss strategies that may improve acceptance and thus uptake of recommended vaccines across a range of population sectors. Directions for research that would provide a more detailed understanding of the complex range of influences on vaccine decisions and their relative importance conclude the paper.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes
EventAcademy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing: looking back, going forward - Hull, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Jul 20176 Jul 2017
https://www.academyofmarketing.org/conference/conference-2017/

Conference

ConferenceAcademy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHull
Period3/07/176/07/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Vaccines
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Mumps
Rubella
Measles
Research
Population

Cite this

Eagle, L., Dahl, S., & Low, D. (2017). Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing, Hull, United Kingdom.
Eagle, Lynne ; Dahl, Stephan ; Low, David. / Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing, Hull, United Kingdom.
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Eagle, L, Dahl, S & Low, D 2017, 'Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored' Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing, Hull, United Kingdom, 3/07/17 - 6/07/17, .

Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored. / Eagle, Lynne; Dahl, Stephan; Low, David.

2017. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing, Hull, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Researchpeer-review

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Eagle L, Dahl S, Low D. Just a little prick? Or a stab in the back? Vaccine uptake explored. 2017. Paper presented at Academy of Marketing Conference 2017: Freedom Through Marketing, Hull, United Kingdom.