KAPRI - ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTION OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES

L. Medlin, Anne Chang, M. Toombs, A. Brown, K. O'Grady

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearch

Abstract

Aim: Respiratory diseases are the leading cause of hospitalization(1) and the 4th leading cause of mortality of Aboriginal people accounting for 8.7 % of all deaths.(1) Despite this, there is limited understanding of Aboriginal Peoples' perspectives on respiratory health and community attitudes to services aimed at reducing the burden of disease. The aim of this study was to identify from an Aboriginal perspective individual and community knowledge and awareness of, and attitudes to, respiratory health.

Method: We employed a mixed methods approach of cross‐sectional surveys and yarning circles (focus groups) with young people and adults in two rural/remote Aboriginal Queensland communities. All data were collected by an Aboriginal researcher (LM). Cross sectional data were analysed using both descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.

Results: Over a two week period in two communities, 233 were screened and 187 enrolled. Of those enrolled, 71.6% were female and 83.4% were aged 18 years and over. One hundred and 21 participants completed a survey and 45 people engaged in yarning's. Major issues identified were a lack of knowledge about respiratory symptoms and the respiratory system and that respiratory health was not a priority unless there were current symptoms.

Conclusion: Despite the burden and origins of respiratory disease, lung health is not a priority. To reduce the burden of disease and impact on future lung health, awareness of respiratory health needs to be enhanced.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberTP 191
Pages (from-to)123-123
Number of pages1
JournalRespirology
Volume19
Issue numberS2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2014

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Attitude to Health
Health
Queensland
Focus Groups
Respiratory System
Lung Diseases
Young Adult
Hospitalization
Research Personnel
Lung
Mortality
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Medlin, L. ; Chang, Anne ; Toombs, M. ; Brown, A. ; O'Grady, K. / KAPRI - ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTION OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES. In: Respirology. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. S2. pp. 123-123.
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title = "KAPRI - ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTION OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES",
abstract = "Aim: Respiratory diseases are the leading cause of hospitalization(1) and the 4th leading cause of mortality of Aboriginal people accounting for 8.7 {\%} of all deaths.(1) Despite this, there is limited understanding of Aboriginal Peoples' perspectives on respiratory health and community attitudes to services aimed at reducing the burden of disease. The aim of this study was to identify from an Aboriginal perspective individual and community knowledge and awareness of, and attitudes to, respiratory health.Method: We employed a mixed methods approach of cross‐sectional surveys and yarning circles (focus groups) with young people and adults in two rural/remote Aboriginal Queensland communities. All data were collected by an Aboriginal researcher (LM). Cross sectional data were analysed using both descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.Results: Over a two week period in two communities, 233 were screened and 187 enrolled. Of those enrolled, 71.6{\%} were female and 83.4{\%} were aged 18 years and over. One hundred and 21 participants completed a survey and 45 people engaged in yarning's. Major issues identified were a lack of knowledge about respiratory symptoms and the respiratory system and that respiratory health was not a priority unless there were current symptoms.Conclusion: Despite the burden and origins of respiratory disease, lung health is not a priority. To reduce the burden of disease and impact on future lung health, awareness of respiratory health needs to be enhanced.",
author = "L. Medlin and Anne Chang and M. Toombs and A. Brown and K. O'Grady",
year = "2014",
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doi = "10.1111/resp.12263_12",
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KAPRI - ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTION OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES. / Medlin, L.; Chang, Anne; Toombs, M.; Brown, A.; O'Grady, K.

In: Respirology, Vol. 19, No. S2, TP 191, 24.03.2014, p. 123-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractResearch

TY - JOUR

T1 - KAPRI - ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTION OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESSES

AU - Medlin, L.

AU - Chang, Anne

AU - Toombs, M.

AU - Brown, A.

AU - O'Grady, K.

PY - 2014/3/24

Y1 - 2014/3/24

N2 - Aim: Respiratory diseases are the leading cause of hospitalization(1) and the 4th leading cause of mortality of Aboriginal people accounting for 8.7 % of all deaths.(1) Despite this, there is limited understanding of Aboriginal Peoples' perspectives on respiratory health and community attitudes to services aimed at reducing the burden of disease. The aim of this study was to identify from an Aboriginal perspective individual and community knowledge and awareness of, and attitudes to, respiratory health.Method: We employed a mixed methods approach of cross‐sectional surveys and yarning circles (focus groups) with young people and adults in two rural/remote Aboriginal Queensland communities. All data were collected by an Aboriginal researcher (LM). Cross sectional data were analysed using both descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.Results: Over a two week period in two communities, 233 were screened and 187 enrolled. Of those enrolled, 71.6% were female and 83.4% were aged 18 years and over. One hundred and 21 participants completed a survey and 45 people engaged in yarning's. Major issues identified were a lack of knowledge about respiratory symptoms and the respiratory system and that respiratory health was not a priority unless there were current symptoms.Conclusion: Despite the burden and origins of respiratory disease, lung health is not a priority. To reduce the burden of disease and impact on future lung health, awareness of respiratory health needs to be enhanced.

AB - Aim: Respiratory diseases are the leading cause of hospitalization(1) and the 4th leading cause of mortality of Aboriginal people accounting for 8.7 % of all deaths.(1) Despite this, there is limited understanding of Aboriginal Peoples' perspectives on respiratory health and community attitudes to services aimed at reducing the burden of disease. The aim of this study was to identify from an Aboriginal perspective individual and community knowledge and awareness of, and attitudes to, respiratory health.Method: We employed a mixed methods approach of cross‐sectional surveys and yarning circles (focus groups) with young people and adults in two rural/remote Aboriginal Queensland communities. All data were collected by an Aboriginal researcher (LM). Cross sectional data were analysed using both descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.Results: Over a two week period in two communities, 233 were screened and 187 enrolled. Of those enrolled, 71.6% were female and 83.4% were aged 18 years and over. One hundred and 21 participants completed a survey and 45 people engaged in yarning's. Major issues identified were a lack of knowledge about respiratory symptoms and the respiratory system and that respiratory health was not a priority unless there were current symptoms.Conclusion: Despite the burden and origins of respiratory disease, lung health is not a priority. To reduce the burden of disease and impact on future lung health, awareness of respiratory health needs to be enhanced.

U2 - 10.1111/resp.12263_12

DO - 10.1111/resp.12263_12

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 19

SP - 123

EP - 123

JO - Respirology

JF - Respirology

SN - 1323-7799

IS - S2

M1 - TP 191

ER -