Let's talk about Vaginas ... Female Genital Mutilation: The failure of International obligations and how to end an abusive cultural tradition

Felicity Harrison

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    While the term “vagina” may be used in different contexts throughout social media, female genital mutilation (‘FGM’) does not receive the same social acknowledgement that it deserves. This article explores the history and culture, and explains that tackling the practice of FGM has been affected by estimated data and the failure to implement decades of international obligations. Social convention associated with ideas of cultural relativism have been prioritised over protection, resulting in a lack of recognition. Simply making law is not the answer. Criminal prosecution combined with non-legal community and social media engagement can draw attention to the controversial topic of FGM and provide a voice for the women and girls who are victim to its practices. Women and girls should have the right not to be subjected to violence. This means not having their vaginas cut. Acknowledgment, debate, and enforcement of FGM’s truths can change how the world complies with international obligations, and can eradicate FGM.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)78-108
    Number of pages31
    JournalGriffith Journal of Law & Human Dignity
    Volume2
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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