Lifelong consequences of poor fetal growth

Susan Sayers, Gurmeet Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

Abstract

he global burden of death, disability and loss of human capital as a result of impaired fetal development is huge, and affects both developed and developing countries. The Indigenous people of Australia have high rates of low birthweight and chronic non-communicable diseases in adulthood, leading to premature adult mortality, with current life expectancies 17 years less than for other Australians. Improvements are occurring in Aboriginal health, but they are overshadowed by the continuing poor health profile of Aboriginal people. The article by Hoy and Nicol in this issue of the Journal is noteworthy in that it highlights the decreases in neonatal and infant mortality in a remote Northern Territory Aboriginal community.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-6
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume192
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jan 2010

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Infant Mortality
Fetal Development
Northern Territory
Premature Mortality
Health
Life Expectancy
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Economics

Cite this

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Lifelong consequences of poor fetal growth. / Sayers, Susan; Singh, Gurmeet.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 192, No. 1, 04.01.2010, p. 5-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

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