Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is the most prevalent metabolic abnormality for Australian Aboriginal men and women even when lean

Tomer Shemesh, Kevin Rowley, Leonard S Piers, James Best, Kerin O'Dea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of the prevalence and risk of the metabolic syndrome to body mass index (BMI) in Australian Aboriginal people. DESIGN: It was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of data obtained from population-based screenings in Aboriginal communities in central and northern Australia (913 participants recruited between 1993 and 1997). RESULTS: Forty-one percent of men and 48% of women conformed to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition for the metabolic syndrome (?=3.72, P=0.054). The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was high in all BMI categories (89 and 95% in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of all other metabolic abnormalities increased linearly with BMI. CONCLUSION: The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in Aboriginal communities and is strongly associated with BMI. Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was the predominant component of the metabolic syndrome across sex groups and BMI strata. � 2008 European Society of Cardiology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-51
Number of pages3
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventative Cardiology
Volume15
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cholesterol
Education
Population

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title = "Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is the most prevalent metabolic abnormality for Australian Aboriginal men and women even when lean",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of the prevalence and risk of the metabolic syndrome to body mass index (BMI) in Australian Aboriginal people. DESIGN: It was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of data obtained from population-based screenings in Aboriginal communities in central and northern Australia (913 participants recruited between 1993 and 1997). RESULTS: Forty-one percent of men and 48{\%} of women conformed to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition for the metabolic syndrome (?=3.72, P=0.054). The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was high in all BMI categories (89 and 95{\%} in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of all other metabolic abnormalities increased linearly with BMI. CONCLUSION: The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in Aboriginal communities and is strongly associated with BMI. Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was the predominant component of the metabolic syndrome across sex groups and BMI strata. � 2008 European Society of Cardiology.",
keywords = "high density lipoprotein, abdominal obesity, Aborigine, adolescent, adult, aged, article, Australia, body mass, controlled study, female, health program, health survey, human, hyperglycemia, hypertension, major clinical study, male, metabolic syndrome X, population research, prevalence, priority journal, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Body Mass Index, Chi-Square Distribution, Cholesterol, LDL, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome X, Middle Aged, Oceanic Ancestry Group, Prevalence",
author = "Tomer Shemesh and Kevin Rowley and Piers, {Leonard S} and James Best and Kerin O'Dea",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "49--51",
journal = "European Journal of Preventative Cardiology",
issn = "1350-6277",
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Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is the most prevalent metabolic abnormality for Australian Aboriginal men and women even when lean. / Shemesh, Tomer; Rowley, Kevin; Piers, Leonard S; Best, James; O'Dea, Kerin.

In: European Journal of Preventative Cardiology, Vol. 15, 2008, p. 49-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is the most prevalent metabolic abnormality for Australian Aboriginal men and women even when lean

AU - Shemesh, Tomer

AU - Rowley, Kevin

AU - Piers, Leonard S

AU - Best, James

AU - O'Dea, Kerin

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of the prevalence and risk of the metabolic syndrome to body mass index (BMI) in Australian Aboriginal people. DESIGN: It was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of data obtained from population-based screenings in Aboriginal communities in central and northern Australia (913 participants recruited between 1993 and 1997). RESULTS: Forty-one percent of men and 48% of women conformed to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition for the metabolic syndrome (?=3.72, P=0.054). The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was high in all BMI categories (89 and 95% in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of all other metabolic abnormalities increased linearly with BMI. CONCLUSION: The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in Aboriginal communities and is strongly associated with BMI. Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was the predominant component of the metabolic syndrome across sex groups and BMI strata. � 2008 European Society of Cardiology.

AB - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of the prevalence and risk of the metabolic syndrome to body mass index (BMI) in Australian Aboriginal people. DESIGN: It was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of data obtained from population-based screenings in Aboriginal communities in central and northern Australia (913 participants recruited between 1993 and 1997). RESULTS: Forty-one percent of men and 48% of women conformed to the National Cholesterol Education Program definition for the metabolic syndrome (?=3.72, P=0.054). The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was high in all BMI categories (89 and 95% in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of all other metabolic abnormalities increased linearly with BMI. CONCLUSION: The metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in Aboriginal communities and is strongly associated with BMI. Low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was the predominant component of the metabolic syndrome across sex groups and BMI strata. � 2008 European Society of Cardiology.

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