LUNG SICKNESS IN MURRI KIDS: A COHORT STUDY IN URBAN INDIGENOUS CHILDREN

K. Hall, Anne Chang, Jennie Anderson, A. Kemp, K. O'Grady

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

    Abstract

    Introduction: Respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom are predominant causes of morbidity in young Australian Indigenous children. With the exception of ear disease, there are limited studies that have addressed burden and outcome. Also, there are no studies that are specific to urban Indigenous children.

    Aim: We aim to comprehensively investigate the incidence, aetiology, risk factors for and outcomes of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in this population.

    Methods: A cohort study of Indigenous children aged less than 5 years registered with an urban Indigenous primary health care service. Comprehensive baseline data are collected and children are followed monthly for 12 months to capture ARI events. ARI events are subsequently followed weekly for 4 weeks to determine cough outcomes, with review by a paediatric respiratory physician if cough has not resolved within 28 days.

    Results: To date, 58 children (57% female) have been enrolled and 46 ARIs have been captured over 907 child weeks of observation (5.1 events per 100 child weeks, 95%CI 3.7–6.8). 13 ARIs (28.3%) have resulted in persistent cough for >28 days following onset.

    Conclusion: Our early findings suggest an excess incidence of ARI in this population. The proportion of ARIs resulting in persistent cough for more than 4 weeks is the highest yet reported.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberTP 054
    Pages (from-to)73-73
    Number of pages1
    JournalRespirology
    Volume19
    Issue numberS2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Mar 2014

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