Managing and mobilising talent in Malaysia:

issues, challenges and policy implications for Malaysian universities

N.a Azman, M.b Sirat, Vincent Pang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

ABSTRACT: The future of Malaysia as a high-income and competitive nation largely depends on its pool of highly skilled human capital. Hence, the issue of human capital development has taken centre stage in numerous reform agendas of Malaysia. This paper seeks to provide examples of policy initiatives aimed at facilitating the management of highly educated talent in Malaysia. It subsequently considers the role of higher education institutions, particularly the universities, as attractors, educators and retainers of intellectuals, in shaping talent. In conclusion, we argue that more significant underlying shortcomings of talent development are derived from the still transitional nature of the reforms and incomplete structural changes occurring in the national system, and that a change in mindset is the first necessary step towards nurturing and developing a human resource talent pool. © 2016 Association for Tertiary Education Management and the LH Martin Institute for Tertiary Education Leadership and Management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-332
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Higher Education Policy and Management
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Malaysia
university
human capital
management
education
reform
intellectual
structural change
human resources
educator
leadership
income

Cite this

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Managing and mobilising talent in Malaysia: issues, challenges and policy implications for Malaysian universities. / Azman, N.a; Sirat, M.b; Pang, Vincent.

In: Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, Vol. 38, No. 3, 2016, p. 316-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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