Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in New South Wales, Australia, 2012–2017

Ravindra Dotel, Matthew V.N. O'Sullivan, Joshua S. Davis, Peter J. Newton, Gwendolyn L. Gilbert

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: To better understand the molecular epidemiology of MRSA and to assess the utility of 19-target binary typing we undertook large-scale epidemiological surveillance of MRSA from invasive and non-invasive clinical specimens, and screening swabs.

    Methods: Binary typing was performed on clinical MRSA isolates collected in New South Wales (NSW), Australia between 01/01/2012 - 31/12/2017. Binary type (BT) predicted multilocus sequence type (ST) and spa types based on results from isolates which had been characterised by both methods.

    Results: 7624 MRSA isolates were analysed of which 3581 (47%) were wounds or skin & softtissue isolates (W/SSTI), 2436 (32%) screening swabs, 469 (6%) blood cultures (BC), 780 (10%) others, and 358 (5%) unknown. We identified 731 BTs, 54 spa types, and 31 STs. ST239 was the commonest MRSA clone in 2012 (30%), but it decreased to 7% in 2017 (p <0.001). In contrast, <0.5% of MRSA were ST45 in 2012 compared to 14% in 2017 (p<0.001). An emergence of PVL-positive ST22 was also noted. Of all isolates, 28% (2122/7624) were lukS/PVL positive; the proportion, among prospectively collected isolates increased from 24% (1406/5858) to 33% (1933/5858) between 2012 and 2017 (p <0.0001). 43% (1534/3581) W/SSTI, 20% (95/469) BC and 10% (239/2436) screening swabs were PVL-positive.

    Conclusions: A major change in the epidemiology of MRSA was noted with a decline of ST239, an emergence of ST45 and PVL-positive ST22, and a significant increase in PVL-positive isolates. Binary typing can be a useful routine laboratory test for prospective molecular surveillance of MRSA colonisation and infection.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)134-140
    Number of pages7
    JournalInfection, Disease and Health
    Volume24
    Issue number3
    Early online date13 May 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

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    South Australia
    New South Wales
    Molecular Epidemiology
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Epidemiology
    Clone Cells
    Skin
    Wounds and Injuries
    Infection

    Cite this

    Dotel, Ravindra ; O'Sullivan, Matthew V.N. ; Davis, Joshua S. ; Newton, Peter J. ; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L. / Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in New South Wales, Australia, 2012–2017. In: Infection, Disease and Health. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 134-140.
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    title = "Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in New South Wales, Australia, 2012–2017",
    abstract = "Background: To better understand the molecular epidemiology of MRSA and to assess the utility of 19-target binary typing we undertook large-scale epidemiological surveillance of MRSA from invasive and non-invasive clinical specimens, and screening swabs. Methods: Binary typing was performed on clinical MRSA isolates collected in New South Wales (NSW), Australia between 01/01/2012 - 31/12/2017. Binary type (BT) predicted multilocus sequence type (ST) and spa types based on results from isolates which had been characterised by both methods. Results: 7624 MRSA isolates were analysed of which 3581 (47{\%}) were wounds or skin & softtissue isolates (W/SSTI), 2436 (32{\%}) screening swabs, 469 (6{\%}) blood cultures (BC), 780 (10{\%}) others, and 358 (5{\%}) unknown. We identified 731 BTs, 54 spa types, and 31 STs. ST239 was the commonest MRSA clone in 2012 (30{\%}), but it decreased to 7{\%} in 2017 (p <0.001). In contrast, <0.5{\%} of MRSA were ST45 in 2012 compared to 14{\%} in 2017 (p<0.001). An emergence of PVL-positive ST22 was also noted. Of all isolates, 28{\%} (2122/7624) were lukS/PVL positive; the proportion, among prospectively collected isolates increased from 24{\%} (1406/5858) to 33{\%} (1933/5858) between 2012 and 2017 (p <0.0001). 43{\%} (1534/3581) W/SSTI, 20{\%} (95/469) BC and 10{\%} (239/2436) screening swabs were PVL-positive. Conclusions: A major change in the epidemiology of MRSA was noted with a decline of ST239, an emergence of ST45 and PVL-positive ST22, and a significant increase in PVL-positive isolates. Binary typing can be a useful routine laboratory test for prospective molecular surveillance of MRSA colonisation and infection.",
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    author = "Ravindra Dotel and O'Sullivan, {Matthew V.N.} and Davis, {Joshua S.} and Newton, {Peter J.} and Gilbert, {Gwendolyn L.}",
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    Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in New South Wales, Australia, 2012–2017. / Dotel, Ravindra; O'Sullivan, Matthew V.N.; Davis, Joshua S.; Newton, Peter J.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    In: Infection, Disease and Health, Vol. 24, No. 3, 08.2019, p. 134-140.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in New South Wales, Australia, 2012–2017

    AU - Dotel, Ravindra

    AU - O'Sullivan, Matthew V.N.

    AU - Davis, Joshua S.

    AU - Newton, Peter J.

    AU - Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

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    N2 - Background: To better understand the molecular epidemiology of MRSA and to assess the utility of 19-target binary typing we undertook large-scale epidemiological surveillance of MRSA from invasive and non-invasive clinical specimens, and screening swabs. Methods: Binary typing was performed on clinical MRSA isolates collected in New South Wales (NSW), Australia between 01/01/2012 - 31/12/2017. Binary type (BT) predicted multilocus sequence type (ST) and spa types based on results from isolates which had been characterised by both methods. Results: 7624 MRSA isolates were analysed of which 3581 (47%) were wounds or skin & softtissue isolates (W/SSTI), 2436 (32%) screening swabs, 469 (6%) blood cultures (BC), 780 (10%) others, and 358 (5%) unknown. We identified 731 BTs, 54 spa types, and 31 STs. ST239 was the commonest MRSA clone in 2012 (30%), but it decreased to 7% in 2017 (p <0.001). In contrast, <0.5% of MRSA were ST45 in 2012 compared to 14% in 2017 (p<0.001). An emergence of PVL-positive ST22 was also noted. Of all isolates, 28% (2122/7624) were lukS/PVL positive; the proportion, among prospectively collected isolates increased from 24% (1406/5858) to 33% (1933/5858) between 2012 and 2017 (p <0.0001). 43% (1534/3581) W/SSTI, 20% (95/469) BC and 10% (239/2436) screening swabs were PVL-positive. Conclusions: A major change in the epidemiology of MRSA was noted with a decline of ST239, an emergence of ST45 and PVL-positive ST22, and a significant increase in PVL-positive isolates. Binary typing can be a useful routine laboratory test for prospective molecular surveillance of MRSA colonisation and infection.

    AB - Background: To better understand the molecular epidemiology of MRSA and to assess the utility of 19-target binary typing we undertook large-scale epidemiological surveillance of MRSA from invasive and non-invasive clinical specimens, and screening swabs. Methods: Binary typing was performed on clinical MRSA isolates collected in New South Wales (NSW), Australia between 01/01/2012 - 31/12/2017. Binary type (BT) predicted multilocus sequence type (ST) and spa types based on results from isolates which had been characterised by both methods. Results: 7624 MRSA isolates were analysed of which 3581 (47%) were wounds or skin & softtissue isolates (W/SSTI), 2436 (32%) screening swabs, 469 (6%) blood cultures (BC), 780 (10%) others, and 358 (5%) unknown. We identified 731 BTs, 54 spa types, and 31 STs. ST239 was the commonest MRSA clone in 2012 (30%), but it decreased to 7% in 2017 (p <0.001). In contrast, <0.5% of MRSA were ST45 in 2012 compared to 14% in 2017 (p<0.001). An emergence of PVL-positive ST22 was also noted. Of all isolates, 28% (2122/7624) were lukS/PVL positive; the proportion, among prospectively collected isolates increased from 24% (1406/5858) to 33% (1933/5858) between 2012 and 2017 (p <0.0001). 43% (1534/3581) W/SSTI, 20% (95/469) BC and 10% (239/2436) screening swabs were PVL-positive. Conclusions: A major change in the epidemiology of MRSA was noted with a decline of ST239, an emergence of ST45 and PVL-positive ST22, and a significant increase in PVL-positive isolates. Binary typing can be a useful routine laboratory test for prospective molecular surveillance of MRSA colonisation and infection.

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    KW - MRSA

    KW - Prospective studies

    KW - Staphylococcal infections

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