Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection

Malcolm McDonald, R TOWERS, Peter Fagan, Jonathan Carapetis, Bart Currie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100% correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71% of throat and 87% of skin isolates although patterns A-C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 - 3.8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.7 - 3.0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 1.8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site. � 2007 Cambridge University Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1398-1405
Number of pages8
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume135
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Pyoderma
Molecular Typing
Streptococcal Infections
Rheumatic Fever
Streptococcus pyogenes
Pharynx
Skin
Streptococcus
Rheumatic Heart Disease
Pharyngitis
Infection
Proteins

Cite this

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title = "Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection",
abstract = "Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100{\%} correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71{\%} of throat and 87{\%} of skin isolates although patterns A-C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2.3, 95{\%} CI 1.4 - 3.8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2.2, 95{\%} CI 1.7 - 3.0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1.4, 95{\%} CI 1.1 - 1.8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site. � 2007 Cambridge University Press.",
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Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection. / McDonald, Malcolm; TOWERS, R; Fagan, Peter; Carapetis, Jonathan; Currie, Bart.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 135, No. 8, 2007, p. 1398-1405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection

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AU - Currie, Bart

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AB - Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100% correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71% of throat and 87% of skin isolates although patterns A-C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 - 3.8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.7 - 3.0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 1.8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site. � 2007 Cambridge University Press.

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KW - M protein

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KW - amino acid sequence

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KW - nonhuman

KW - pharyngitis

KW - pyoderma

KW - rheumatic fever

KW - rheumatic heart disease

KW - sequence analysis

KW - skin culture

KW - skin infection

KW - Streptococcus group A

KW - Streptococcus infection

KW - Streptococcus pyogenes

KW - throat culture

KW - child

KW - classification

KW - DNA sequence

KW - female

KW - genetics

KW - genotype

KW - isolation and purification

KW - male

KW - microbiology

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KW - skin

KW - Antigens, Bacterial

KW - Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins

KW - Bacterial Typing Techniques

KW - Carrier Proteins

KW - Child

KW - DNA, Bacterial

KW - Female

KW - Genotype

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Pharynx

KW - Pyoderma

KW - Rheumatic Fever

KW - Rural Population

KW - Sequence Analysis, DNA

KW - Skin

KW - Streptococcal Infections

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JO - Epidemiology and Infection

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SN - 0950-2688

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