Monitoring and assessing the quality of care for youth

Developing an audit tool using an expert consensus approach

Stefanie Puszka, Tricia Nagel, Veronica Matthews, Diana Mosca, Rebecca Piovesan, Annapurna Nori, Ross Bailie

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Abstract

Background: The mental health needs of young people are often inadequately met by health services. Quality improvement approaches provide a framework for measuring, assessing and improving the quality of healthcare. However, a lack of performance standards and measurement tools are an impediment to their implementation. This paper reports on the initial stages of development of a clinical audit tool for assessing the quality of primary healthcare for Australian Indigenous youth aged 12–24 including mental health services provided within primary care.

Methods: Audit items were determined through review of relevant guidelines, expert reference group consensus opinion and specific inclusion criteria. Pilot testing was undertaken at four Indigenous primary healthcare services. A focus group discussion involving five staff from a health service participating in pilot testing explored user experiences of the tool.

Results: Audit items comprise key measures of processes and outcomes of care for Indigenous youth, as determined by the expert reference group. Gaps and conflicts in relevant guidelines and a lack of agreed performance indicators necessitated a tool development process that relied heavily on expert reference group advice and audit item inclusion criteria. Pilot testing and user feedback highlighted the importance of feasibility and context-specific considerations in tool development and design.

Conclusions: The youth health audit tool provides a first step in monitoring, assessing and improving the way Indigenous primary healthcare services engage with and respond to the needs of youth. Our approach offers a way forward for further development of quality measures in the absence of clearly articulated standards of care.

Original languageEnglish
Article number28
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Systems
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2015

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Quality of Health Care
Primary Health Care
Consensus
Health Services
Guidelines
Clinical Audit
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Mental Health Services
Standard of Care
Quality Improvement
Focus Groups
Mental Health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Health

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Puszka, Stefanie ; Nagel, Tricia ; Matthews, Veronica ; Mosca, Diana ; Piovesan, Rebecca ; Nori, Annapurna ; Bailie, Ross. / Monitoring and assessing the quality of care for youth : Developing an audit tool using an expert consensus approach. In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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Monitoring and assessing the quality of care for youth : Developing an audit tool using an expert consensus approach. / Puszka, Stefanie; Nagel, Tricia; Matthews, Veronica; Mosca, Diana; Piovesan, Rebecca; Nori, Annapurna; Bailie, Ross.

In: International Journal of Mental Health Systems, Vol. 9, No. 1, 28, 13.07.2015, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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