Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna

an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps

Danielle Stokeld, Anke Frank, B Hill, J Choy, Terrance Mahney, A Stevens, Stuart Young, W Rangers, D GRANGER, G Gillespie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Context: Feral cats are a major cause of mammal declines and extinctions in Australia. However, cats are elusive and obtaining reliable ecological data is challenging. Although camera traps are increasingly being used to study feral cats, their successful use in northern Australia has been limited. 
    Aims: We evaluated the efficacy of camera-trap sampling designs for detecting cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia. We aimed to develop a camera-trapping method that would yield detection probabilities adequate for precise occupancy estimates. 
    Methods: First, we assessed the influence of two micro-habitat placements and three lure types on camera-trap detection rates of feral cats. Second, using multiple camera traps at each site, we examined the relationship between sampling effort and detection probability by using a multi-method occupancy model.
    Key results: We found no significant difference in detection rates of feral cats using a variety of lures and micro-habitat placement. The mean probability of detecting a cat on one camera during one week of sampling was very low (p?0.15) and had high uncertainty. However, the probability of detecting a cat on at least one of five cameras deployed concurrently on a site was 48% higher (p?0.22) and had a greater precision. Conclusions: The sampling effort required to achieve detection rates adequate to infer occupancy of feral cats by camera trap is considerably higher in northern Australia than has been observed elsewhere in Australia. Adequate detection of feral cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia will necessitate inclusion of more camera traps and a longer survey duration. 
    Implications: Sampling designs using camera traps need to be rigorously trialled and assessed to optimise detection of the target species for different Australian biomes. A standard approach is suggested for detecting feral cats in northern Australian savannas.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)642-649
    Number of pages8
    JournalWildlife Research
    Volume42
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    savanna
    savannas
    traps
    cats
    sampling
    microhabitat
    biome
    detection
    evaluation
    trapping
    mammal
    extinction
    habitats
    uncertainty
    methodology
    mammals
    rate
    method
    duration

    Cite this

    Stokeld, Danielle ; Frank, Anke ; Hill, B ; Choy, J ; Mahney, Terrance ; Stevens, A ; Young, Stuart ; Rangers, W ; GRANGER, D ; Gillespie, G. / Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna : an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps. In: Wildlife Research. 2015 ; Vol. 42, No. 8. pp. 642-649.
    @article{37fc2dddab9f45b8ad616337e236404c,
    title = "Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna: an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps",
    abstract = "Context: Feral cats are a major cause of mammal declines and extinctions in Australia. However, cats are elusive and obtaining reliable ecological data is challenging. Although camera traps are increasingly being used to study feral cats, their successful use in northern Australia has been limited. Aims: We evaluated the efficacy of camera-trap sampling designs for detecting cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia. We aimed to develop a camera-trapping method that would yield detection probabilities adequate for precise occupancy estimates. Methods: First, we assessed the influence of two micro-habitat placements and three lure types on camera-trap detection rates of feral cats. Second, using multiple camera traps at each site, we examined the relationship between sampling effort and detection probability by using a multi-method occupancy model.Key results: We found no significant difference in detection rates of feral cats using a variety of lures and micro-habitat placement. The mean probability of detecting a cat on one camera during one week of sampling was very low (p?0.15) and had high uncertainty. However, the probability of detecting a cat on at least one of five cameras deployed concurrently on a site was 48{\%} higher (p?0.22) and had a greater precision. Conclusions: The sampling effort required to achieve detection rates adequate to infer occupancy of feral cats by camera trap is considerably higher in northern Australia than has been observed elsewhere in Australia. Adequate detection of feral cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia will necessitate inclusion of more camera traps and a longer survey duration. Implications: Sampling designs using camera traps need to be rigorously trialled and assessed to optimise detection of the target species for different Australian biomes. A standard approach is suggested for detecting feral cats in northern Australian savannas.",
    keywords = "Felis catus, Mammalia",
    author = "Danielle Stokeld and Anke Frank and B Hill and J Choy and Terrance Mahney and A Stevens and Stuart Young and W Rangers and D GRANGER and G Gillespie",
    year = "2015",
    doi = "10.1071/WR15083",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "642--649",
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    Stokeld, D, Frank, A, Hill, B, Choy, J, Mahney, T, Stevens, A, Young, S, Rangers, W, GRANGER, D & Gillespie, G 2015, 'Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna: an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps', Wildlife Research, vol. 42, no. 8, pp. 642-649. https://doi.org/10.1071/WR15083

    Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna : an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps. / Stokeld, Danielle; Frank, Anke; Hill, B; Choy, J; Mahney, Terrance; Stevens, A; Young, Stuart; Rangers, W; GRANGER, D; Gillespie, G.

    In: Wildlife Research, Vol. 42, No. 8, 2015, p. 642-649.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Multiple cameras required to reliably detect feral cats in northern Australian tropical savanna

    T2 - an evaluation of sampling design when using camera traps

    AU - Stokeld, Danielle

    AU - Frank, Anke

    AU - Hill, B

    AU - Choy, J

    AU - Mahney, Terrance

    AU - Stevens, A

    AU - Young, Stuart

    AU - Rangers, W

    AU - GRANGER, D

    AU - Gillespie, G

    PY - 2015

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    N2 - Context: Feral cats are a major cause of mammal declines and extinctions in Australia. However, cats are elusive and obtaining reliable ecological data is challenging. Although camera traps are increasingly being used to study feral cats, their successful use in northern Australia has been limited. Aims: We evaluated the efficacy of camera-trap sampling designs for detecting cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia. We aimed to develop a camera-trapping method that would yield detection probabilities adequate for precise occupancy estimates. Methods: First, we assessed the influence of two micro-habitat placements and three lure types on camera-trap detection rates of feral cats. Second, using multiple camera traps at each site, we examined the relationship between sampling effort and detection probability by using a multi-method occupancy model.Key results: We found no significant difference in detection rates of feral cats using a variety of lures and micro-habitat placement. The mean probability of detecting a cat on one camera during one week of sampling was very low (p?0.15) and had high uncertainty. However, the probability of detecting a cat on at least one of five cameras deployed concurrently on a site was 48% higher (p?0.22) and had a greater precision. Conclusions: The sampling effort required to achieve detection rates adequate to infer occupancy of feral cats by camera trap is considerably higher in northern Australia than has been observed elsewhere in Australia. Adequate detection of feral cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia will necessitate inclusion of more camera traps and a longer survey duration. Implications: Sampling designs using camera traps need to be rigorously trialled and assessed to optimise detection of the target species for different Australian biomes. A standard approach is suggested for detecting feral cats in northern Australian savannas.

    AB - Context: Feral cats are a major cause of mammal declines and extinctions in Australia. However, cats are elusive and obtaining reliable ecological data is challenging. Although camera traps are increasingly being used to study feral cats, their successful use in northern Australia has been limited. Aims: We evaluated the efficacy of camera-trap sampling designs for detecting cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia. We aimed to develop a camera-trapping method that would yield detection probabilities adequate for precise occupancy estimates. Methods: First, we assessed the influence of two micro-habitat placements and three lure types on camera-trap detection rates of feral cats. Second, using multiple camera traps at each site, we examined the relationship between sampling effort and detection probability by using a multi-method occupancy model.Key results: We found no significant difference in detection rates of feral cats using a variety of lures and micro-habitat placement. The mean probability of detecting a cat on one camera during one week of sampling was very low (p?0.15) and had high uncertainty. However, the probability of detecting a cat on at least one of five cameras deployed concurrently on a site was 48% higher (p?0.22) and had a greater precision. Conclusions: The sampling effort required to achieve detection rates adequate to infer occupancy of feral cats by camera trap is considerably higher in northern Australia than has been observed elsewhere in Australia. Adequate detection of feral cats in the tropical savanna of northern Australia will necessitate inclusion of more camera traps and a longer survey duration. Implications: Sampling designs using camera traps need to be rigorously trialled and assessed to optimise detection of the target species for different Australian biomes. A standard approach is suggested for detecting feral cats in northern Australian savannas.

    KW - Felis catus

    KW - Mammalia

    UR - http://www.publish.csiro.au/wr/WR15083

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    SN - 1035-3712

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    ER -