Non-Threatening Other-Race Faces Capture Visual Attention

Evidence from a Dot-Probe Task

Shahd Al-Janabi, Colin MacLeod, Gillian Rhodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Visual attentional biases towards other-race faces have been attributed to the perceived threat value of such faces. It is possible, however, that they reflect the relative visual novelty of other-race faces. Here we demonstrate an attentional bias to other-race faces in the absence of perceived threat. White participants rated female East Asian faces as no more threatening than female own-race faces. Nevertheless, using a new dot-probe paradigm that can distinguish attentional capture and hold effects, we found that these other-race faces selectively captured visual attention. Importantly, this demonstration challenges previous interpretations of attentional biases to other-race faces as threat responses. Future studies will need to determine whether perceived threat increases attentional biases to other-race faces, beyond the levels seen here.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere46119
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Non-Threatening Other-Race Faces Capture Visual Attention : Evidence from a Dot-Probe Task. / Al-Janabi, Shahd; MacLeod, Colin; Rhodes, Gillian.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 10, e46119, 03.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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