Now you see it; now you don't. Looking for the 'remote advantage' in the development of Northern Australia

Developing Northern Australia: recognising remote mixed-market economies

Judith Lovell, John Guenther, Don Zoellner

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Researchpeer-review

    Abstract

    One challenge for Northern Australian development is national sampling cannot adequately represent the drivers of economic participation in sparse populations across remote Australia. Over the last four years the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation’s (CRC-REP) programs have gathered data with remote Aboriginalcommunities, industries and service sector representatives in parts of remote NorthernTerritory, South Australia, Queensland and Western Australia. As a synthesis of findingsfrom those projects and relevant literature, we ask what and how ‘mixed-market’ activitiescontribute to structures of economic participation in a sample of remote communities in Central Australia. Finally, we consider what this insight contributes to the discourse ofsustainable development in Northern Australia.
    ‘Mixed-markets’ are those which combine the opportunity and investment of both market and non-markets, such as government or philanthropy. Clustering a sample of remotecommunities in Central Australia, we compare employment and industry participation datawith the presence or lack of local mixed-market structures and activities. We determine thatnational data is not adequately representing the scope of mixed-market economic activitieswhich are so essential to remote Australians. In light of unpacking this finding, we describe anumber of key findings and address three of the key issues. The first is the scale required tointerpret the values and variables asserted through customary, natural and linguisticcharacteristics that contribute to mixed-market activity. The second is the burgeoning andvaluable remote capacity and advantage which is associated with mixed-markets and thatunderpin those activities; and the third examines how the benefits flowing from these can inform the agenda for the sustainable development of northern Australia (AustralianGovernment 2013; Northern Territory Government 2013).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages41-63
    Number of pages23
    Publication statusPublished - 2015
    EventDeveloping Northern Australia Conference 2015 - Rydges Southbank, Townsville
    Duration: 20 Jul 201522 Jul 2015

    Conference

    ConferenceDeveloping Northern Australia Conference 2015
    Period20/07/1522/07/15

    Fingerprint

    Market economy
    Economics
    Participation
    Government
    Industry
    Market activity
    Queensland
    Clustering
    Sustainable development
    Discourse
    Sampling
    Western Australia
    Research center
    Market structure
    Program participation
    Agenda
    Cooperative research
    Service sector
    Philanthropy

    Cite this

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    title = "Now you see it; now you don't. Looking for the 'remote advantage' in the development of Northern Australia: Developing Northern Australia: recognising remote mixed-market economies",
    abstract = "One challenge for Northern Australian development is national sampling cannot adequately represent the drivers of economic participation in sparse populations across remote Australia. Over the last four years the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation’s (CRC-REP) programs have gathered data with remote Aboriginalcommunities, industries and service sector representatives in parts of remote NorthernTerritory, South Australia, Queensland and Western Australia. As a synthesis of findingsfrom those projects and relevant literature, we ask what and how ‘mixed-market’ activitiescontribute to structures of economic participation in a sample of remote communities in Central Australia. Finally, we consider what this insight contributes to the discourse ofsustainable development in Northern Australia.‘Mixed-markets’ are those which combine the opportunity and investment of both market and non-markets, such as government or philanthropy. Clustering a sample of remotecommunities in Central Australia, we compare employment and industry participation datawith the presence or lack of local mixed-market structures and activities. We determine thatnational data is not adequately representing the scope of mixed-market economic activitieswhich are so essential to remote Australians. In light of unpacking this finding, we describe anumber of key findings and address three of the key issues. The first is the scale required tointerpret the values and variables asserted through customary, natural and linguisticcharacteristics that contribute to mixed-market activity. The second is the burgeoning andvaluable remote capacity and advantage which is associated with mixed-markets and thatunderpin those activities; and the third examines how the benefits flowing from these can inform the agenda for the sustainable development of northern Australia (AustralianGovernment 2013; Northern Territory Government 2013).",
    author = "Judith Lovell and John Guenther and Don Zoellner",
    year = "2015",
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    pages = "41--63",
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    Lovell, J, Guenther, J & Zoellner, D 2015, 'Now you see it; now you don't. Looking for the 'remote advantage' in the development of Northern Australia: Developing Northern Australia: recognising remote mixed-market economies' Paper presented at Developing Northern Australia Conference 2015, 20/07/15 - 22/07/15, pp. 41-63.

    Now you see it; now you don't. Looking for the 'remote advantage' in the development of Northern Australia : Developing Northern Australia: recognising remote mixed-market economies. / Lovell, Judith; Guenther, John; Zoellner, Don.

    2015. 41-63 Paper presented at Developing Northern Australia Conference 2015, .

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)Researchpeer-review

    TY - CONF

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    T2 - Developing Northern Australia: recognising remote mixed-market economies

    AU - Lovell, Judith

    AU - Guenther, John

    AU - Zoellner, Don

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    N2 - One challenge for Northern Australian development is national sampling cannot adequately represent the drivers of economic participation in sparse populations across remote Australia. Over the last four years the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation’s (CRC-REP) programs have gathered data with remote Aboriginalcommunities, industries and service sector representatives in parts of remote NorthernTerritory, South Australia, Queensland and Western Australia. As a synthesis of findingsfrom those projects and relevant literature, we ask what and how ‘mixed-market’ activitiescontribute to structures of economic participation in a sample of remote communities in Central Australia. Finally, we consider what this insight contributes to the discourse ofsustainable development in Northern Australia.‘Mixed-markets’ are those which combine the opportunity and investment of both market and non-markets, such as government or philanthropy. Clustering a sample of remotecommunities in Central Australia, we compare employment and industry participation datawith the presence or lack of local mixed-market structures and activities. We determine thatnational data is not adequately representing the scope of mixed-market economic activitieswhich are so essential to remote Australians. In light of unpacking this finding, we describe anumber of key findings and address three of the key issues. The first is the scale required tointerpret the values and variables asserted through customary, natural and linguisticcharacteristics that contribute to mixed-market activity. The second is the burgeoning andvaluable remote capacity and advantage which is associated with mixed-markets and thatunderpin those activities; and the third examines how the benefits flowing from these can inform the agenda for the sustainable development of northern Australia (AustralianGovernment 2013; Northern Territory Government 2013).

    AB - One challenge for Northern Australian development is national sampling cannot adequately represent the drivers of economic participation in sparse populations across remote Australia. Over the last four years the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation’s (CRC-REP) programs have gathered data with remote Aboriginalcommunities, industries and service sector representatives in parts of remote NorthernTerritory, South Australia, Queensland and Western Australia. As a synthesis of findingsfrom those projects and relevant literature, we ask what and how ‘mixed-market’ activitiescontribute to structures of economic participation in a sample of remote communities in Central Australia. Finally, we consider what this insight contributes to the discourse ofsustainable development in Northern Australia.‘Mixed-markets’ are those which combine the opportunity and investment of both market and non-markets, such as government or philanthropy. Clustering a sample of remotecommunities in Central Australia, we compare employment and industry participation datawith the presence or lack of local mixed-market structures and activities. We determine thatnational data is not adequately representing the scope of mixed-market economic activitieswhich are so essential to remote Australians. In light of unpacking this finding, we describe anumber of key findings and address three of the key issues. The first is the scale required tointerpret the values and variables asserted through customary, natural and linguisticcharacteristics that contribute to mixed-market activity. The second is the burgeoning andvaluable remote capacity and advantage which is associated with mixed-markets and thatunderpin those activities; and the third examines how the benefits flowing from these can inform the agenda for the sustainable development of northern Australia (AustralianGovernment 2013; Northern Territory Government 2013).

    M3 - Conference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)

    SP - 41

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