Obstructive sleep apnea in Aboriginal Australians: Polysomnographic outcomes and symptom perception post-continuous positive airway pressure implementation

Matthew Lindfield, Timothy P Howarth, Ara J Perez, Jessie Crespo, Charmain B Atos, Hsin-Chia C Huang, Subash S Heraganahally

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Abstract

Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is reported to be highly prevalent among Aboriginal Australians. However, no studies have assessed the implementation and efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in this population. Hence, we compared the clinical, self-reported perception of sleep quality and polysomnographic (PSG) characteristics among Aboriginal patients with OSA. Methods: Adult Aboriginal Australians who underwent both diagnostic (Type 1 and 2) and in-lab CPAP implementation studies were included. Results: Total of 149 patients were identified (46% female, median age 49 years, body mass index 35 kg/m 2). The OSA severity was 6% mild, 26% moderate, and 68% severe on the diagnostic PSG. On application of CPAP, there were significant improvements in; total arousal index (diagnostic 29 to 17/h on CPAP), total apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) (diagnostic 48 to 9/h on CPAP), non-rapid eye movement AHI (diagnostic 47 to 8/h on CPAP), rapid eye movement (REM) AHI (diagnostic 56 to 8/h on CPAP) and oxygen saturation (SpO 2) nadir (diagnostic 77% to 85% on CPAP) (p < 0.001 for each). Following a single night of CPAP, 54% of patients reported sleeping “better than normal” compared to 12% following the diagnostic study (p = 0.003). In multivariate regression models, males had a significantly lesser change in REM AHI than females (5.7 events/hour less change (IQR 0.4, 11.1), p = 0.029). Conclusions: There is substantial improvement in several sleep-related domains on the application of CPAP among Aboriginal patients with a good initial acceptance of treatment. Whether the positive impact observed in this study translates to better sleep health outcomes with long-term adherence to CPAP therapy is yet to be assessed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzpad015
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalSLEEP Advances
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2023

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