Occupancy of the invasive feral cat varies with habitat complexity

Rosemary Hohnen, Katherine Tuft, Hugh W. McGregor, Sarah Legge, Ian J. Radford, Christopher N. Johnson

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    Abstract

    The domestic cat (Felis catus) is an invasive exotic in many locations around the world and is thought to be a key factor driving recent mammal declines across northern Australia. Many mammal species native to this region now persist only in areas with high topographic complexity, provided by features such as gorges or escarpments. Do mammals persist in these habitats because cats occupy them less, or despite high cat occupancy? We show that occupancy of feral cats was lower in mammal-rich habitats of high topographic complexity. These results support the idea that predation pressure by feral cats is a factor contributing to the collapse of mammal communities across northern Australia. Managing impacts of feral cats is a global conservation challenge. Conservation actions such as choosing sites for small mammal reintroductions may be more successful if variation in cat occupancy with landscape features is taken into account.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere0152520
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume11
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

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    Hohnen, R., Tuft, K., McGregor, H. W., Legge, S., Radford, I. J., & Johnson, C. N. (2016). Occupancy of the invasive feral cat varies with habitat complexity. PLoS One, 11(9), [e0152520]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152520