Online Clinical Legal Education

Challenging the Traditional Model

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    Abstract

    It has been suggested that the “Digital Age provides an opportunity to revitalize and modernize legal education and to make it more individualized, relevant, human, and accessible”.1 Delivery of law degree programs fully online is one way the internet has begun to change, if not (yet) revolutionise, legal education in the twenty-first century. In Australia, law students have been able to obtain their law degree online for a number of years. Online clinical legal education, however, is still in its infancy. In this article, the authors argue that the greater use of technology in legal education is inevitable, and law schools offering degrees fully online will continue to increase, at least in Australia. The rewards and risks of online legal education are considered from the perspective of a law school in which over 80% of its 855 students study law fully online. The development and implementation of clinical opportunities for students studying online also is discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)33-79
    Number of pages36
    JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Legal Education
    Volume23
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    title = "Online Clinical Legal Education: Challenging the Traditional Model",
    abstract = "It has been suggested that the “Digital Age provides an opportunity to revitalize and modernize legal education and to make it more individualized, relevant, human, and accessible”.1 Delivery of law degree programs fully online is one way the internet has begun to change, if not (yet) revolutionise, legal education in the twenty-first century. In Australia, law students have been able to obtain their law degree online for a number of years. Online clinical legal education, however, is still in its infancy. In this article, the authors argue that the greater use of technology in legal education is inevitable, and law schools offering degrees fully online will continue to increase, at least in Australia. The rewards and risks of online legal education are considered from the perspective of a law school in which over 80{\%} of its 855 students study law fully online. The development and implementation of clinical opportunities for students studying online also is discussed.",
    author = "Leslie Mccrimmon and Ros Vickers and Kenneth Parish",
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    Online Clinical Legal Education : Challenging the Traditional Model. / Mccrimmon, Leslie; Vickers, Ros; Parish, Kenneth.

    In: International Journal of Clinical Legal Education, Vol. 23, No. 5, 2016, p. 33-79.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AB - It has been suggested that the “Digital Age provides an opportunity to revitalize and modernize legal education and to make it more individualized, relevant, human, and accessible”.1 Delivery of law degree programs fully online is one way the internet has begun to change, if not (yet) revolutionise, legal education in the twenty-first century. In Australia, law students have been able to obtain their law degree online for a number of years. Online clinical legal education, however, is still in its infancy. In this article, the authors argue that the greater use of technology in legal education is inevitable, and law schools offering degrees fully online will continue to increase, at least in Australia. The rewards and risks of online legal education are considered from the perspective of a law school in which over 80% of its 855 students study law fully online. The development and implementation of clinical opportunities for students studying online also is discussed.

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