Paediatric invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Queensland, Australia, 2002-2011: Young Indigenous children remain at highest risk

Gavin Cleland, Clare Leung, Jenny Wan Sai Cheong, Joshua Francis, Claire Heney, Clare Nourse

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Aim: Haemophilus influenzae continues to cause invasive disease in children despite widespread Hib immunisation. The significance of non-B serotypes continues to be investigated, with evidence of increased invasive non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi) world-wide. The aim of this study was to examine the current epidemiological and clinical features of invasive H. influenzae disease in children in Queensland, Australia. 

    Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all cases of invasive H. influenzae disease in children <18years of age in Queensland between January 2002 and December 2011. Cases were identified from pathology records and data requested from treating hospitals. 

    Results: Laboratory data were obtained for 144 cases and clinical/demographic data for 123 cases. The majority (72%) of cases were children <5years of age. Annual incidence rate for all children <5years was 7.4/100000, and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children <5years was 10.2/100000. Serotype was reported for 132 isolates, 69 NTHi and 63 encapsulated strains. The most common clinical diagnoses were pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia without clinical focus. Of the patients, 5 patients died, and 12 had significant morbidity at hospital discharge. 

    Conclusions: While rates of invasive H. influenzae disease have decreased dramatically following the introduction of Hib vaccination, H. influenzae remains a cause of significant morbidity and mortality, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children remain particularly vulnerable.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)36-41
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
    Volume54
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Paediatric invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Queensland, Australia, 2002-2011: Young Indigenous children remain at highest risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this