Paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practice following provision of educational resources about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Janet Payne, Kathryn France, Nadine Henley, Heather D'Antoine, A Bartu, Raewyn Mutch, Elizabeth Elliott, Carol Bower

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Aim: The study aims to providepaediatricians in Western Australia (WA) with educational resources (http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy)about the prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrumdisorder, and assess changes in their knowledge, attitudes and practice aboutfetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and alcohol consumption in pregnancy.

     

    Methods: Following our 2004 surveyof paediatricians, we developed and distributed educational resources to 159paediatricians in WA in 2007. Six months later, we surveyed thesepaediatricians and compared their responses with results from 2004 usingprevalence rate ratios (PRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

     

    Results: Of 133 eligiblepaediatricians, 82 (61.7%) responded: 65.9% had seen the resources, of these66.7% had used them and 29.6% said the resources had helped them change, orinfluenced their intent to change, their practice. There was no change in theproportion that knew all the essential features of FAS (18.3% in 2007; 20.0% in2004) or had diagnosed FAS (58.5% in 2007; 58.9% in 2004). An increasedproportion (75.6% in 2007; 48.9% in 2004) agreed that pregnant women shouldcompletely abstain from consuming alcohol (PRR 1.55, 95% CI 1.21–1.97). Only21.7% (no increase from 2004) routinely asked about alcohol use when taking apregnancy history.

     

    Conclusions: We recommend thatasking about alcohol use during pregnancy should be emphasised in paediatrictraining. Unless paediatricians' capacity to ask about alcohol consumption whentaking a pregnancy history and to diagnose FAS is increased, FAS will remainunder-diagnosed in Australia and opportunities for management, earlyintervention and prevention will be overlooked.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)704-710
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
    Volume47
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

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    Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders
    Alcohols
    Western Australia
    Alcohol Drinking
    Confidence Intervals
    Pregnancy
    Reproductive History
    Pediatricians
    Pregnant Women
    History

    Cite this

    Payne, Janet ; France, Kathryn ; Henley, Nadine ; D'Antoine, Heather ; Bartu, A ; Mutch, Raewyn ; Elliott, Elizabeth ; Bower, Carol. / Paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practice following provision of educational resources about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2011 ; Vol. 47, No. 10. pp. 704-710.
    @article{9c4f02e06ec04f27b76709684e414521,
    title = "Paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practice following provision of educational resources about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder",
    abstract = "Aim: The study aims to providepaediatricians in Western Australia (WA) with educational resources (http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy)about the prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrumdisorder, and assess changes in their knowledge, attitudes and practice aboutfetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and alcohol consumption in pregnancy. Methods: Following our 2004 surveyof paediatricians, we developed and distributed educational resources to 159paediatricians in WA in 2007. Six months later, we surveyed thesepaediatricians and compared their responses with results from 2004 usingprevalence rate ratios (PRRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Of 133 eligiblepaediatricians, 82 (61.7{\%}) responded: 65.9{\%} had seen the resources, of these66.7{\%} had used them and 29.6{\%} said the resources had helped them change, orinfluenced their intent to change, their practice. There was no change in theproportion that knew all the essential features of FAS (18.3{\%} in 2007; 20.0{\%} in2004) or had diagnosed FAS (58.5{\%} in 2007; 58.9{\%} in 2004). An increasedproportion (75.6{\%} in 2007; 48.9{\%} in 2004) agreed that pregnant women shouldcompletely abstain from consuming alcohol (PRR 1.55, 95{\%} CI 1.21–1.97). Only21.7{\%} (no increase from 2004) routinely asked about alcohol use when taking apregnancy history. Conclusions: We recommend thatasking about alcohol use during pregnancy should be emphasised in paediatrictraining. Unless paediatricians' capacity to ask about alcohol consumption whentaking a pregnancy history and to diagnose FAS is increased, FAS will remainunder-diagnosed in Australia and opportunities for management, earlyintervention and prevention will be overlooked.",
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    author = "Janet Payne and Kathryn France and Nadine Henley and Heather D'Antoine and A Bartu and Raewyn Mutch and Elizabeth Elliott and Carol Bower",
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    Paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practice following provision of educational resources about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. / Payne, Janet; France, Kathryn; Henley, Nadine; D'Antoine, Heather; Bartu, A; Mutch, Raewyn; Elliott, Elizabeth; Bower, Carol.

    In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 47, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 704-710.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Paediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and practice following provision of educational resources about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    AU - Payne, Janet

    AU - France, Kathryn

    AU - Henley, Nadine

    AU - D'Antoine, Heather

    AU - Bartu, A

    AU - Mutch, Raewyn

    AU - Elliott, Elizabeth

    AU - Bower, Carol

    PY - 2011/10

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    N2 - Aim: The study aims to providepaediatricians in Western Australia (WA) with educational resources (http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy)about the prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrumdisorder, and assess changes in their knowledge, attitudes and practice aboutfetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and alcohol consumption in pregnancy. Methods: Following our 2004 surveyof paediatricians, we developed and distributed educational resources to 159paediatricians in WA in 2007. Six months later, we surveyed thesepaediatricians and compared their responses with results from 2004 usingprevalence rate ratios (PRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Of 133 eligiblepaediatricians, 82 (61.7%) responded: 65.9% had seen the resources, of these66.7% had used them and 29.6% said the resources had helped them change, orinfluenced their intent to change, their practice. There was no change in theproportion that knew all the essential features of FAS (18.3% in 2007; 20.0% in2004) or had diagnosed FAS (58.5% in 2007; 58.9% in 2004). An increasedproportion (75.6% in 2007; 48.9% in 2004) agreed that pregnant women shouldcompletely abstain from consuming alcohol (PRR 1.55, 95% CI 1.21–1.97). Only21.7% (no increase from 2004) routinely asked about alcohol use when taking apregnancy history. Conclusions: We recommend thatasking about alcohol use during pregnancy should be emphasised in paediatrictraining. Unless paediatricians' capacity to ask about alcohol consumption whentaking a pregnancy history and to diagnose FAS is increased, FAS will remainunder-diagnosed in Australia and opportunities for management, earlyintervention and prevention will be overlooked.

    AB - Aim: The study aims to providepaediatricians in Western Australia (WA) with educational resources (http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy)about the prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrumdisorder, and assess changes in their knowledge, attitudes and practice aboutfetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and alcohol consumption in pregnancy. Methods: Following our 2004 surveyof paediatricians, we developed and distributed educational resources to 159paediatricians in WA in 2007. Six months later, we surveyed thesepaediatricians and compared their responses with results from 2004 usingprevalence rate ratios (PRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Of 133 eligiblepaediatricians, 82 (61.7%) responded: 65.9% had seen the resources, of these66.7% had used them and 29.6% said the resources had helped them change, orinfluenced their intent to change, their practice. There was no change in theproportion that knew all the essential features of FAS (18.3% in 2007; 20.0% in2004) or had diagnosed FAS (58.5% in 2007; 58.9% in 2004). An increasedproportion (75.6% in 2007; 48.9% in 2004) agreed that pregnant women shouldcompletely abstain from consuming alcohol (PRR 1.55, 95% CI 1.21–1.97). Only21.7% (no increase from 2004) routinely asked about alcohol use when taking apregnancy history. Conclusions: We recommend thatasking about alcohol use during pregnancy should be emphasised in paediatrictraining. Unless paediatricians' capacity to ask about alcohol consumption whentaking a pregnancy history and to diagnose FAS is increased, FAS will remainunder-diagnosed in Australia and opportunities for management, earlyintervention and prevention will be overlooked.

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