Patient Information Resources on Cardiovascular Health After Cancer Treatment: An Audit of Australian Resources

Abbey Diaz, Jorja McErlane, Mi Hye Jeon, Joan Cunningham, Victoria Sullivan, Gail Garvey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Up to one third of patients with cancer are thought to experience adverse cardiovascular events after their cancer diagnosis and treatment. High-quality information about cancer treatment-related cardiovascular disease can prepare patients and reduce anxiety. The aim of this project was to systematically identify Australian online information resources about cardiovascular health after cancer and assess the readability, understandability, actionability, and cultural relevance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. 

METHODS: We conducted systematic Google and website searches to identify potentially relevant resources. Eligibility was assessed using predefined criteria. For each eligible resource, we summarized the content and assessed readability, understandability, actionability, and cultural relevance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 

RESULTS: Seventeen online resources addressing cardiovascular health after cancer were identified: three focused solely on cardiovascular health and the remaining 14 dedicated between <1% and 48% of the word count to this topic. On average, three of 12 predefined content areas were covered by the resources. Only one resource was considered comprehensive, covering eight of 12 content areas. Overall, 18% of the resources were deemed readable for the average Australian adult, 41% deemed understandable, and only 24% had moderate actionability. None of the resources were considered culturally relevant for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with 41% addressing only one of the seven possible criteria and the remainder addressing none of the criteria.

CONCLUSION: This audit confirms a gap in online information resources about cardiovascular health after cancer. New resources, especially for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, are needed. The development of such resources must be done through involvement and collaboration with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, families, and carers, through a codesign process.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2200361
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJCO global oncology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2023

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