Pattern, prediction and parsimony in continental-scale synthesis of pyromes

a reply to Gosper et al.

Brett Murphy, Michael Lawes, David Bowman

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

    Abstract

    We (Murphy et al., 2013; Clarke et al., 2015) have recently developed a framework to understand the spatial distribution of fire regimes and plant fire-response traits at large spatial scales. We integrated a range of data sources to create a continental-scale overview of Australian pyromes from which to infer pyrogeographic drivers. Gosper et al. (in press) have criticized our approach, based on our misclassification of a vegetation type (eucalypt woodland), with distinct fire regime, in the Coolgardie bioregion of Western Australia. We argue that the intention of our integrative approach was to develop and refine conceptual models of Australian pyrogeography, not to produce a predictive map of fire regimes, and certainly not to guide local-scale fire management. Like all models, continental-scale syntheses of pyromes are imperfect, yet they still represent powerful tools for understanding the drivers of the spatial distribution of fire regimes. 
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)636-638
    Number of pages3
    JournalJournal of Biogeography
    Volume43
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    fire regime
    synthesis
    prediction
    spatial distribution
    vegetation types
    fire management
    Western Australia
    woodlands
    vegetation type
    woodland

    Cite this

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    title = "Pattern, prediction and parsimony in continental-scale synthesis of pyromes: a reply to Gosper et al.",
    abstract = "We (Murphy et al., 2013; Clarke et al., 2015) have recently developed a framework to understand the spatial distribution of fire regimes and plant fire-response traits at large spatial scales. We integrated a range of data sources to create a continental-scale overview of Australian pyromes from which to infer pyrogeographic drivers. Gosper et al. (in press) have criticized our approach, based on our misclassification of a vegetation type (eucalypt woodland), with distinct fire regime, in the Coolgardie bioregion of Western Australia. We argue that the intention of our integrative approach was to develop and refine conceptual models of Australian pyrogeography, not to produce a predictive map of fire regimes, and certainly not to guide local-scale fire management. Like all models, continental-scale syntheses of pyromes are imperfect, yet they still represent powerful tools for understanding the drivers of the spatial distribution of fire regimes. ",
    author = "Brett Murphy and Michael Lawes and David Bowman",
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    language = "English",
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    pages = "636--638",
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    Pattern, prediction and parsimony in continental-scale synthesis of pyromes : a reply to Gosper et al. / Murphy, Brett; Lawes, Michael; Bowman, David.

    In: Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 43, No. 3, 2016, p. 636-638.

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Pattern, prediction and parsimony in continental-scale synthesis of pyromes

    T2 - a reply to Gosper et al.

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    AU - Lawes, Michael

    AU - Bowman, David

    PY - 2016

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    N2 - We (Murphy et al., 2013; Clarke et al., 2015) have recently developed a framework to understand the spatial distribution of fire regimes and plant fire-response traits at large spatial scales. We integrated a range of data sources to create a continental-scale overview of Australian pyromes from which to infer pyrogeographic drivers. Gosper et al. (in press) have criticized our approach, based on our misclassification of a vegetation type (eucalypt woodland), with distinct fire regime, in the Coolgardie bioregion of Western Australia. We argue that the intention of our integrative approach was to develop and refine conceptual models of Australian pyrogeography, not to produce a predictive map of fire regimes, and certainly not to guide local-scale fire management. Like all models, continental-scale syntheses of pyromes are imperfect, yet they still represent powerful tools for understanding the drivers of the spatial distribution of fire regimes. 

    AB - We (Murphy et al., 2013; Clarke et al., 2015) have recently developed a framework to understand the spatial distribution of fire regimes and plant fire-response traits at large spatial scales. We integrated a range of data sources to create a continental-scale overview of Australian pyromes from which to infer pyrogeographic drivers. Gosper et al. (in press) have criticized our approach, based on our misclassification of a vegetation type (eucalypt woodland), with distinct fire regime, in the Coolgardie bioregion of Western Australia. We argue that the intention of our integrative approach was to develop and refine conceptual models of Australian pyrogeography, not to produce a predictive map of fire regimes, and certainly not to guide local-scale fire management. Like all models, continental-scale syntheses of pyromes are imperfect, yet they still represent powerful tools for understanding the drivers of the spatial distribution of fire regimes. 

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    U2 - 10.1111/jbi.12691

    DO - 10.1111/jbi.12691

    M3 - Comment/debate

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    JO - Journal of Biogeography

    JF - Journal of Biogeography

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