Perinatal Risk Factors Associated with Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Children in Western Australia (2000-2012): A Record Linkage Cohort Study

Parveen Fathima, Thomas Laurence Snelling, Nicholas de Klerk, Deborah Lehmann, Christopher Charles Blyth, Claire Shelley Waddington, Hannah Catherine Moore

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background: Gastroenteritis is a leading cause of childhood morbidity worldwide. We aimed to assess the maternal and infant characteristics and population attributable fractions (PAFs) associated with childhood gastroenteritis-related hospitalizations.

    Methods: We conducted a whole-of-population retrospective birth cohort study of 367,476 children live-born in Western Australia (WA) 2000-2012. We identified hospital admissions up to age <15 years pertaining to these children, with a principal diagnosis code for infectious gastroenteritis. Cox regression was used to obtain the adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and the PAFs associated with each risk factor in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children for their first gastroenteritis hospital admission.

    Results: There were a total of 15,888 gastroenteritis-related hospital admissions (25.7% occurring among Aboriginal children). The overall gastroenteritis hospitalization rate for children aged <15 years was 4.6/1000 child-years for non-Aboriginal children and 21.5/1000 child-years for Aboriginal children. Male gender, maternal age <20 years, pre-term birth, low birth weight, residence in remote regions of WA and birth in the pre-rotavirus vaccine era were significant independent risk factors for gastroenteritis hospitalization in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. Additionally, birth by caesarean section and low socio-economic status were identified as being associated with gastroenteritis hospitalization in non-Aboriginal children. PAFs suggest that 39% of all gastroenteritis hospitalizations in non-Aboriginal children (38% in Aboriginal children) could be averted if all children receive the rotavirus vaccine.

    Conclusion: Given the beneficial effect of infant rotavirus vaccination in preventing all-cause gastroenteritis hospitalization, efforts should be taken to optimize rotavirus vaccine coverage in those at highest risk.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)169-175
    Number of pages7
    JournalThe Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
    Volume38
    Issue number2
    Early online date31 Mar 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Perinatal Risk Factors Associated with Gastroenteritis Hospitalizations in Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Children in Western Australia (2000-2012): A Record Linkage Cohort Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this